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Flag of the European Union: With the support of the Erasmus+ Programme
With the support of the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union
Head shot of Yannis Stivachtis
Jean Monnet Chair and Director, CEUTTSS. Political Science, International Studies

Yannis A. Stivachtis’ research and teaching interests include European Union strategy, EU’s foreign, security, and defense policy, transatlantic relations, European organizations, and regionalism and international society (EU, Europe and North America, and Eurasia). He is currently the editor of the Critical European Studies book series (Routledge) and co-editor of the Athens Journal of Mediterranean Studies (AJMS). His professional service includes senior analyst of the Center for European and Mediterranean Affairs (CEMA-ATINER, Greece); external expert of the Research Executive Agency (REA) of the European Commission (EC); and senior advisor of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS, Greece). His most recent books include: The Routledge Handbook of Critical European Studies (Routledge, 2021; co-editor); Revisiting the Idea of the European Union as Empire (Routledge, 2015; co-editor); Europe after Enlargement (Routledge, 2014; co-editor); The European Union and Peace-building (special issue, Review of European Studies, 5(3), 2013; co-editor); EUrope and the World (special issue, Review of European Studies, 4(3), 2012; editor); and The Economic Dimension of Turkey’s Accession to the European Union (Brussels University Press, 2011; co-editor).

ystivach@vt.edu

119 Major Williams Hall

540.231.5816

 

Colin Baker in the classroom

Colin Baker in the classroom
Colin Baker, Montgomery County Public Schools, AP/College Board

Colin Baker is a Blacksburg High School teacher, partnering with CEUTTSS to develop our K-12 programming. He has been collaborating with the Jean Monnet network since 2014. He earned an M.A. Honours in Politics and Modern History at the University of Edinburgh and an M.Sc.Ed, (Secondary Education) at ODU. Baker currently serves as AP European History Co-Chair, College Board's National Development Committee. A native of Scotland, Baker has been involved in a number of EU/modern European research trips/grants, conferences, studies and is looking forward to expanding that work at VT in support of the vital EU-US Transatlantic relationship.

cbakermcps@vt.edu

cbaker@mcps.org  

 

 

Head shot of Aaron Brantly
Aaron Brantly, Political Science. Director, Tech4Humanity Lab.

 

Aaron Brantly's research focuses on national security policy issues in cyberspace including Artificial Intelligence, decision-making and human rights related to the United States, NATO, and Eastern Europe. He is the author or editor of four books (The Decision to Attack: Military and Intelligence Cyber Decision-making, US National Cybersecurity: International Politics, Concepts and Organization, Cybersecurity: Politics, Governance and Conflict in Cyberspace, and The Cyber Deterrence Problem) and a number of peer-reviewed articles on national and international cyber conflict, information operations, big data and intelligence. Brantly has advised, briefed or trained multiple national policymakers on issues related to cyber conflict and terrorism - including the Secretaries of Defense and Homeland Security, multiple combatant commanders, congressional offices, the FBI, DIA, NYPD, and FDNY. He served as a senior policy expert on the United States Cyberspace Solarium Commission in 2019-2020. He has participated in or led several military research missions Latvia, Lithuania, Georgia, Estonia and Ukraine to foster transatlantic understandings of technology enabled conflict. Prior to academia, Dr. Brantly served as a Senior Program officer for ICT innovation at the National Democratic Institute and worked on democracy development activities in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia, Ukraine, Russia, and Kosovo. He earned a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Georgia and a Master’s of Public Policy from The American University.  

 

 

abrantly@vt.edu

526 Major Williams Hall

 

Head shot of Esther Bauer
Esther Bauer, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures (MCLL), Women's and Gender Studies, the Center for Gerontology

Esther Bauer’s research specializes in German literature and culture since the late nineteenth century, particularly the Weimar Republic and today, and focuses on questions of subjectivity, gender, desire, love, age and aging, and visualizations of bodies. She has published on writers Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Vicki Baum, Max Frisch, and Judith Hermann, and on painters Egon Schiele, Christian Schad, and Otto Dix. Her book Bodily Desire, Desired Bodies: Gender and Desire in Early Twentieth-Century German and Austrian Novels and Paintings came out with Northwestern UP in 2014. Her articles have appeared in journals such as the German Quarterly, Seminar, Feminist German Studies, Weimarer Beiträge, and Monatshefte. Recently, her research has focused on the role of images of masculinity in times of crisis and change, including the First World War and the interwar years, and on non-hegemonic masculinities, e.g., gay masculinities. She is now working on a new book on male midlife and quarterlife crises in German literary prose texts and art since 1900. Together with Dr. Chiara Piazzesi (Sociology, Université de Québec à Montréal), she is collaborating on a project on male aging crises in German and North American popular cultures.

bauere@vt.edu

330 Major Williams Hall

540.231.9846

Chad Hankinson

chadhankinson@vt.edu

512 Major Williams Hall

504.231.9744

Head shot of Scott Nelson
Scott Nelson, Political Science and ASPECT

Scott Nelson is a political theorist and political economist whose current research focuses on theories of globalization, legitimation crises, inequality, and populism. He is the author of Sovereignty and the Limits of the Liberal Imagination (Routledge, 2010) and the co-editor (with Nevzat Soguk) of the Ashgate Research Companion to Modern Theory, Modern Power, World Politics: Critical Investigations (Ashgate, 2016). He is currently completing a book on democracy and citizenship with Bradley S. Klein, and a book on political economy with Joel T. Shelton. Professor Nelson's recent scholarship addresses the historical and sociological dimensions of Europe's experiences with capitalism and open markets. Professor Nelson co-founded two programs based at the Steger Center for International Scholarship in Riva san Vitale, Switzerland: the fall study abroad program "European Affairs in a Global Context" (with Yannis Stivachtis) and the summer study abroad program "European Perspectives on Integrated Security" (with Aaron Brantly and Yannis Stivachtis).

As the CEUTTSS Associate Director of Operations at the Steger Center, Professor Nelson coordinates the Virginia Tech Jean Monnet Center's educational, research and outreach efforts in Europe.

 

 

scnelson@vt.edu

119 Major Williams

540-231-5874

 

Head shot of Joel Peters
Joel Peters, Associate Director of Operations, NCR. School of Public and International Affairs - Government and International affairs Program

 

Joel Peters’ research interests and publications cover Israeli politics and foreign policy, the Arab-Israeli peace process, regional cooperation in the Middle East and Europe’s relations in the Middle East and the Mediterranean. He is the co-author (with Sharon Pardo) of Uneasy Neighbors: Israel and the European Union and Israel and the European Union A Documentary History. Peters is currently working on a book on Israeli foreign policy since the end of the Cold War.

 

 

peters25@vt.edu

Virginia Tech Research Center VTRC- 6-032A

571.858.3117

Georgeta Pourchot
Georgeta Pourchot

Georgeta Pourchot has over 20 years of international programming experience in think tanks and institutions of
higher education, working both independently and collaboratively on national and
international research projects, policy development, academic program start-up and management, graduate recruitment and advising, alumni relations, teaching and writing. She also helped establish and negotiated MOUs for international graduate program agreements,
including a unique double MA in international studies. She has written on democratization processes in former communist countries and served as editor and author of an extensive array of articles and reports published nationally and internationally.

bpula@vt.edu

 

 

Head shot of Besnik Pula
Besnik Pula, Political Science

Besnik Pula is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science. His research lies is in the areas of international and comparative political economy, the study post-communist transformations, and social theory. He is the author of Globalization Under and After Socialism: The Evolution of Transnational Capital in Central and Eastern Europe (Stanford University Press, 2018) and his research has appeared in numerous journals including East European Politics, New Political Economy, Political Power and Social Theory, Comparative Studies in History and Society, Theory and Society, Journal for the Theory of Social Behavior, and as various book chapters. Dr. Pula has been a recipient of fellowships and grants from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright-Hays program, International Research and Exchanges Board, American Council for Learned Societies, National Council for Eurasian and East European Research, and the International Institute at the University of Michigan and his work has been awarded by the American Sociological Association.

bpula@vt.edu

 

 

Head shot of Danna Agmon
Danna Agmon, History and ASPECT

Danna Agmon is a historian of French empire, specializing in the history of French India in the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Her first book, titled "A Colonial Affair: Commerce, Conversion, and Scandal in French India," published in 2017 by Cornell University Press, offers a comprehensive analysis of the competing French projects of trade and religion in the Indian Ocean at the turn of the eighteenth century. She is currently working on a book titled "A World at Court: Nested Legality and French Empire in the Indian Ocean," which charts how different modes of resolving disputes were enacted and transformed in French colonial courts. This project has been supported by the Social Science Research Council and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship.

Agmon received a PhD in Anthropology and History from the University of Michigan, and is a member of the History department at Virginia Tech, and Core Faculty in the ASPECT program, an interdisciplinary PhD program.

dagmon@vt.edu

 

 

 

Head shot of Carmen Gitre
Carmen Gitre, History and ASPECT

Carmen Gitre is an Associate Professor of Middle East History. She earned her Ph.D. at Rutgers University in 2011. Between 2011 and 2014, she taught in the International Studies and History Departments at Seattle University. Her academic interests include cultural history, theater, power, and relationships between performance, identity, and modernity. Her book, Acting Egyptian: Theater, Identity, and Political Culture in Cairo, 1867-1930 was published by the University of Texas Press in 2019. Currently, she is exploring different forms of humor in interwar Egypt.

cgitre@vt.edu

 

 

 

Head shot of Heather Gumbert
Heather Gumbert, History

Heather Gumbert is a cultural historian of twentieth century Europe, especially Germany. She is particularly interested in media narratives in the context of the European Cold War. Her first book, Envisioning Socialism (Michigan, 2014) explores the role of television in mediating competing visions of socialism in the first two decades of the GDR. She is currently working on a book, tentatively titled Watching the Wall, which explores the complex and contradictory role of the Wall in the Cold War. She will continue to explore the transnational importance of television in the 20th century world in a more focused work on the emergence and growth of industrial television centers in cities that became significant nodes in postwar networks of circulation and exchange.

hgumbert@vt.edu

435 Major Williams Hall  

 

Rachel Midura

head shot of Rachel Midura
Rachel Midura, History

Rachel Midura is an assistant professor of digital history in Virginia Tech’s Department of History. She completed her PhD in 2020 at Stanford University, where she was a senior graduate research fellow at the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Professor Midura approaches the seventeenth century as an information age created by the printing press and European postal networks. She reconstructs historical relations among objects, people, and places. She designs and helps manage projects related to the Stanford Mapping the Republic of Letters Project, such as the Early Modern Digital Itineraries and the Grand Tour Projects, which critically examine surviving early modern corpora, increasing accessibility and historical knowledge through digital curation and annotation. Her personal research focuses on the culture of the seventeenth-century post. In her book project, she uses postal itineraries, epistolary novels, and early newspapers to reconstruct a pan-European network of communication across a turbulent religious and political landscape.

rmidura@vt.edu

   

Anndal Narayanan is an Instructor of Modern Military History. He specializes in the impacts of decolonization on French politics and society. His first book, forthcoming with the University of Nebraska Press, is titled Home from the war with no name: the Algerian War veterans’ movement in France. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Modern European History from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and his B.A. in History and French from Goucher College.

anarayanan@vt.edu

 

 

 

Robert Stephens with model Hokie Bird
Robert Stephens, History and ASPECT

Robert P. Stephens is an associate professor in the Department of History. His research focuses on the cultural history of drugs and the history of modern Europe. He has served as the founding Principal of the Honors Residential College and as Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. He serves as Treasurer and on the Executive Committee of the International Alcohol and Drugs History Society. He is a leading scholar in the history of drugs in Germany.

rosteph2@vt.edu

 


431 Major Williams Hall (0117)
220 Stanger St.
Blacksburg, VA 24061

(540) 231-8371

Nadine Sinno

Head shot of Nadine Sinno
Nadine Sinno, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Nadine Sinno is Associate Professor of Arabic and Director of the Arabic Program in the
Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures. Her research interests include modern Arabic and Arab-American literature and cultural studies, particularly focusing on gender and sexuality, Arab/Muslim feminism, ecocriticism, and visual culture. She is a literary
translator from Arabic to English. Sinno’s scholarly work relates to the center through its
exploration of issues including diasporic identities and immigrant experiences, the impact of globalization on the constructions of Arab masculinities and femininities, Islam and the West, transnational feminism, and cultural hybridity as manifested in Arabic literature, film, and
graffiti.

Sinno’s scholarly work has appeared in journals including the Journal of Arabic Literature,
the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, Middle East Critique, Middle Eastern
Literatures
, Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States, College Literature, and ASAP/Journal. Her publications also include an edited volume with Mohja Kahf, entitled Constructions of Masculinity in the Middle East and North Africa (2021), a translation of Nazik Saba Yared’s novel Canceled Memories (2009) and a translation with Paula Haydar of Rashid al-Daif’s novel Who’s Afraid of Meryl Streep? (2014) from Arabic to English.

nadine7@vt.edu

 

Major Williams Hall 306

Alexander Dickow

Head shot of Alexander Dickow
Alexander Dickow, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Alexander Dickow's interest in the Center comes from a commitment to world literature through translation and through working with journals such as Asymptote and Trafika Europe. He is associate professor of French, and specializes especially in 20th- and 21st-century French and Francophone poetry and film. He has taught at Virginia Tech since Fall 2011.

ard@vt.edu

 

Major Williams Hall 125

Sharon Johnson

Head shot of Sharon Johnson
Sharon Johnson, Modern and Classical Languages and literatures; Women's and Gender Studies,

Sharon P Johnson is a 19th-century French scholar, and her research has focused on writers such as Gustave Flaubert, Guy de Maupassant, Emile Zola and Mathilde Bourdon and painters such as Mary Cassatt, Paul Cézanne, Berthe Morisot and Artemisia Gentileschi. Her current book project, Bodies that Speak: Narrating and Interpreting Rape in Law, Medicine and the Penny Presses (canards sanglants) of Nineteenth-Century France, analyses representations of rape in legal, medical and journalistic discourses.

Johnson is an Associate Professor of French in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures and Director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, housed in the Sociology Department. She is serving on the CEUTTSS’s Education Committee in the capacity of Teaching Excellence and Quality for its majors and minors. She will have served as President of the Academy of Teaching Excellence (ATE) for a two-year term, ending spring 2021. She is the winner of several teaching awards: the William E. Wine Teaching Award; the Diggs Teaching Scholar Award; the Certificate of Teaching Excellence Award and with her colleagues the University Exemplary Department Award, twice. In 2020, the WGS Program’s course offerings were showcased as one component of the Sociology Department’s diversity. In 2001, with professors from the French Program of the CLAHS and the Pamplin College of Business, new French and Business opportunities in both areas were created, thanks to a Department of Education Title VI Grant.

 

spjohnso@vt.edu

   

Corinne Noirot

head shot of Corinne Noirot
Corinne Noirot, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Corinne Noirot, Associate Professor of French, was born and educated in France, one of the founding E.U. countries. Besides language courses, she teaches early modern and modern culture, literature, Renaissance philosophy, and French pop music, at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

She is the author of “Entre deux airs”: style simple et ethos poétique chez Clément Marot et Joachim Du Bellay (2013), and co-editor of “Revelations of Character.” Ethos and Moral Philosophy in Montaigne (2007). She has penned numerous articles on Marot, Du Bellay, Ronsard, La Taille, Labé, Peletier du Mans, Vian, Goudezki, Bégaudeau, Rabelais, and Montaigne. She is currently working on Jean de la Taille, a heterodox soldier poet of the French Wars of Religion (post-Reformation Europe) while preparing a collaborative edition of the La Taille brothers’ dramatic works.

cnoirot@vt.edu

 



 

Head shot of Esther Bauer
Esther Bauer, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures (MCLL), Women's and Gender Studies, the Center for Gerontology

Esther Bauer’s research specializes in German literature and culture since the late nineteenth century, particularly the Weimar Republic and today, and focuses on questions of subjectivity, gender, desire, love, age and aging, and visualizations of bodies. She has published on writers Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Vicki Baum, Max Frisch, and Judith Hermann, and on painters Egon Schiele, Christian Schad, and Otto Dix. Her book Bodily Desire, Desired Bodies: Gender and Desire in Early Twentieth-Century German and Austrian Novels and Paintings came out with Northwestern UP in 2014. Her articles have appeared in journals such as the German Quarterly, Seminar, Feminist German Studies, Weimarer Beiträge, and Monatshefte. Recently, her research has focused on the role of images of masculinity in times of crisis and change, including the First World War and the interwar years, and on non-hegemonic masculinities, e.g., gay masculinities. She is now working on a new book on male midlife and quarterlife crises in German literary prose texts and art since 1900. Together with Dr. Chiara Piazzesi (Sociology, Université de Québec à Montréal), she is collaborating on a project on male aging crises in German and North American popular cultures.

bauere@vt.edu

330 Major Williams Hall

540.231.9846

Bryan Klausmeyer, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Medium shot of Bryan Klausmeyer, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures
Bryan Klausmeyer, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Bryan Klausmeyer’s research and teaching focus on the intersection of 18th- and 19th-century German literature, the history of science, and media theory. His current book project, Small Forms: Micrologies of German Literature and Science around 1800, examines the poetics and pragmatics of smallness in the long 18th century, with a particular focus on the writings of Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, Jean Paul, and Goethe. He has also published articles on this and related topics in journals such as MonatshefteThe Germanic Review, and Goethe Yearbook.

klausmeyer@vt.edu

310 Major Williams Hall

540.231.5362

Maria del Carmen Caña Jiménez

Head shot of Maria del Carmen Caña Jiménez
Maria del Carmen Caña Jiménez, MCLL

María del Carmen Caña Jiménez is the author of over 20 articles on Latin American and Spanish Literatures, Cinemas and Popular Cultures, Violence Studies, Neoliberalism and Citizenship, and Television Studies. Caña Jiménez is the editor of Desafíos, diferencias y deformaciones de la ciudadanía: mutantes y monstruos en la producción cultural latinoamericana reciente (A Contracorriente, 2020) and “Beyond Violence (Criticism) in Contemporary Hispanic Narratives and Cinemas” (Hispanófila 178, 2016). She also co-edited with Vinodh Venkatesh Horacio Castellanos Moya: El diablo en el espejo (Albatros 2016) and “Affect, Bodies, and Circulations in Contemporary Latin American Film” (Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies 20, 2016). Caña Jiménez serves as the Latin American book review editor of Hispanófila.

canajime@vt.edu

 

332 Major Williams Hall

Jessica Folkart

Head shot of Jessica Folkart
Jessica Folkart, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Jessica A. Folkart is Professor of Spanish and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures. Her research centers on the cultural representation of identity, immigration, and the liminal body in contemporary Spain. She has authored two books, Liminal Fiction at the Edge of the Millennium: The Ends of Spanish Identity (Bucknell University Press, 2014) and Angles on Otherness in Post-Franco Spain: The Fiction of Cristina Fernández Cubas (Bucknell University Press, 2002), and many articles on Peninsular Spanish literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Her articles have appeared in such journals as Philosophy and Literature, Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, and Hispanic Review. She teaches courses such as Sex and Subversion in Modern Spain, Phantasms in Spanish Film and Fiction, and Sex and Power in Spain: Romanticism to Fascism.

Folkart is an affiliate faculty member with the Women and Gender Studies Program and the PhD program for the Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT). She has won numerous teaching awards and is a member of the Academy of Teaching Excellence at Virginia Tech.

jfolkart@vt.edu

 

 

Head shot of Paul Avey
Paul C. Avey, Political Science.

Paul Avey is interested in nuclear politics, U.S. foreign policy, strategy, and international relations theory. Avey's work frequently engages U.S. and European security issues in these contexts. He is the author of Tempting Fate: Why Nonnuclear States Confront Nuclear Opponents (Cornell University Press, 2019), and the author or co-author of articles in International Security, Security Studies, International Studies Quarterly, Foreign Policy Analysis, Texas National Security Review, Journal of Global Security Studies, and others. Avey was a 2018-2019 Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow based in the U.S. Department of Defense, serving as Senior Advisor for Strategy in the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and Force Development.

pcavey@vt.edu

   
Head shot of Binio Binev
Binio Binev, Political Science.

Binio Binev is interested in the comparative politics of Europe, including political economy, and parties and populism. Methodologically his work  develops ways to combine historical, probabilistic, and fieldwork perspectives in cross-regional and transatlantic research, particularly comparing developments in post-communist Europe and Latin America. Binev has carried out fieldwork in Central Europe and the Andes, and his research has been supported by the German Academic Exchange Service, Columbia University’s Center for European Studies, Georgetown University, and Virginia Tech. He is currently working on a book exploring parallel developments in terms of the long-term political consequences of market reform in Central and Eastern Europe and Latin America. Binev teaches a variety of courses in comparative and European politics, such as European Political Systems, Industrial Democracies, Topics in European Integration, European Union Politics, and Democracy and Populism in Europe and the Americas. He has taught at traditional institutions of higher learning and worked with incarcerated individuals at the Washington DC Central Detention Facility (DC Jail). Binev received his postgraduate education at Georgetown University, earning an MA in German and European Studies from the Walsh School of Foreign Service and a PhD in Government.

biniobinev@vt.edu

 

 

 

Head shot of Clair Apodaca
Mauro Caraccioli, Political Science and ASPECT

Mauro J. Caraccioli is a historian of political thought, specializing in the intellectual, political, and ecological exchanges between Europe and the Americas in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. His first book, Writing the New World: The Politics of Natural History in the Early Spanish Empire (University of Florida Press, 2021), examines the interplay of faith, nature, and empire in Colonial Spanish America and the natural histories produced by early modern Spanish missionaries to the New World. He is currently working on an edited collection (with Einar Wigen, University of Oslo) titled Interlingual Relations: The Global Politics of Linguistic Difference, which maps the role of translation and linguistic diversity across formative episodes, encounters, and exchanges in the history of global politics. This project has been supported by the International Studies Association and reflects an international partnership between Virginia Tech and the University of Oslo.

mauroj@vt.edu

Lillian Frost is a Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute for the 2020–21 academic year. She specializes in forced migration, citizenship, and gender issues, particularly in the Arab World, and including how these issues manifest in relations between Europe and the Middle East. Her first book project examines variations in the sets of rights in law and practice that host states grant to refugee groups over time, focusing particularly on ambiguous policies that say one thing in law and another in practice in Jordan. This research draws on over 14 months of fieldwork in Jordan, with funding support from the United States Institute of Peace and the Minerva Research Initiative, Harvard Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Fulbright Program, Council of American Overseas Research Centers, Project on Middle East Political Science, Boston Consortium for Arab Region Studies and the George Washington University Institute for Middle East Studies.

lfrost@vt.edu

Jennifer Lawrence

Head shot of Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence, Political Science; Disaster Resilience and Risk Management research group; ASPECT, Center for Leadership and Global Sustainability

Dr. Jennifer L. Lawrence is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Politics and Policy in the Department of Political Science at Virginia Tech. Her scholarship is inspired by economic and environmental contradictions that are bound up within the extractive industries and she works to interrogate the systemic production of crisis at the intersection of political economy and the environment and specifically focuses on extractive logics of governance. Demonstrating the spatio-temporal tensions between chronic and acute socio-environmental disasters and the role that visibility and representation play in our understanding of environmental degradation, Dr. Lawrence’s work highlights contradictions at the intersection of economic systems, resource extraction, and socio-environmental (in)justice. Recent book projects include Biopolitical Disaster (Routledge, 2017) and The Resilience Machine (Routledge, 2018).

jennlaw@vt.edu

   
Head shot of Scott Nelson
Scott Nelson, International Relations. Political Science and ASPECT

Scott Nelson is a political theorist and political economist whose current research focuses on theories of globalization, legitimation crises, inequality, and populism. He is the author of Sovereignty and the Limits of the Liberal Imagination (Routledge, 2010) and the co-editor (with Nevzat Soguk) of the Ashgate Research Companion to Modern Theory, Modern Power, World Politics: Critical Investigations (Ashgate, 2016). He is currently completing a book on democracy and citizenship with Bradley S. Klein, and a book on political economy with Joel T. Shelton. Professor Nelson's recent scholarship addresses the historical and sociological dimensions of Europe's experiences with capitalism and open markets. Professor Nelson co-founded two programs based at the Steger Center for International Scholarship in Riva san Vitale, Switzerland: the fall study abroad program "European Affairs in a Global Context" (with Yannis Stivachtis) and the summer study abroad program "European Perspectives on Integrated Security" (with Aaron Brantly and Yannis Stivachtis).

As the CEUTTSS Associate Director of Operations at the Steger Center, Professor Nelson coordinates the Virginia Tech Jean Monnet Center's educational, research and outreach efforts in Europe.

scnelson@vt.edu

119 Major Williams

540-231-5874

 

Head shot of Georgeta Pourchot
Georgeta Pourchot, Political Science

 

Georgeta Pourchot is a founding member of the Romanian Green Party, and a former member of Romanian Chamber of Deputees. Her research and teaching interests range from US-EU-Russia-Eurasia relations, to EU’s security and foreign policy, democratization (Central Europe, MENA region and African countries), media studies, international and regional organizations, terrorism and counter-terrorism. Her professional expertise includes working for the Center for Strategic and International Studies (Washington DC), business consultancy for Fortune 500 companies expanding their markets in Central Europe, developing government-business-think-tank-academia relations, and coaching civil society representatives in Central and Eastern Europe. Pourchot published a book on Eurasia Rising: Democracy and Independence in the Post-Soviet Space (Praeger 2008), book chapters on aspects of the democratization process in Central Europe, and peer-reviewed articles in European Security, the Journal of Eurasian Studies, and the Journal of European Integration on NATO enlargement, OSCE’s role in creating a pan-European society, and the growing literature of EU’s ‘empire’.

georgeta@vt.edu

 

 

Head shot of Besnik Pula
Besnik Pula, Political Science

Besnik Pula is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science. His research lies is in the areas of international and comparative political economy, the study post-communist transformations, and social theory. He is the author of Globalization Under and After Socialism: The Evolution of Transnational Capital in Central and Eastern Europe (Stanford University Press, 2018) and his research has appeared in numerous journals including East European Politics, New Political Economy, Political Power and Social Theory, Comparative Studies in History and Society, Theory and Society, Journal for the Theory of Social Behavior, and as various book chapters. Dr. Pula has been a recipient of fellowships and grants from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright-Hays program, International Research and Exchanges Board, American Council for Learned Societies, National Council for Eurasian and East European Research, and the International Institute at the University of Michigan and his work has been awarded by the American Sociological Association.

bpula@vt.edu

 

 

Head shot of Andy Scerri
Andy Scerri, Political Science, ASPECT, PPE, Kellogg Center

Andy Scerri is an associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Department of Political Science. His research interests sit at the intersection of environmental political theory and policy studies, and focus on the relationship between economic redistribution and awareness of climate change in the US, Europe, and Australasia since the 1970s. He is author of two books, Greening Citizenship (2012) and Postpolitics and the Limits of Nature (2019), and articles in journals including Environmental Politics, Environmental Values, Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy, Appalachian Studies, and Citizenship Studies. Scerri is currently working on a book project designed to bring environmental considerations to bear on debates sparked by democratic republican calls for a sortition-based third chamber or citizens’ house of review.

ajscerri@vt.edu

515 Major Williams Hall

540.231.8843

 
Head shot of Yannis Stivachtis
Jean Monnet Chair and Director, CEUTTSS. Political Science, International Studies

Yannis A. Stivachtis’ research and teaching interests include European Union strategy, EU’s foreign, security, and defense policy, transatlantic relations, European organizations, and regionalism and international society (EU, Europe and North America, and Eurasia). He is currently the editor of the Critical European Studies book series (Routledge) and co-editor of the Athens Journal of Mediterranean Studies (AJMS). His professional service includes senior analyst of the Center for European and Mediterranean Affairs (CEMA-ATINER, Greece); external expert of the Research Executive Agency (REA) of the European Commission (EC); and senior advisor of the Research Institute for European and American Studies (RIEAS, Greece). His most recent books include: The Routledge Handbook of Critical European Studies (Routledge, 2021; co-editor); Revisiting the Idea of the European Union as Empire (Routledge, 2015; co-editor); Europe after Enlargement (Routledge, 2014; co-editor); The European Union and Peace-building (special issue, Review of European Studies, 5(3), 2013; co-editor); EUrope and the World (special issue, Review of European Studies, 4(3), 2012; editor); and The Economic Dimension of Turkey’s Accession to the European Union (Brussels University Press, 2011; co-editor).

ystivach@vt.edu

119 Major Williams Hall

540.231.5816

 

Barbara Allen

Head shot of Barbara Allen
Barbara Allen, Science and Technology Studies

Barbara Allen's research and respective reseach sites for the last 15 years have been in France and Italy. She is interested in environmental policy and regulation in polluted regions and the extent to which, or not, residents can participate in making that policy.

Allen's current focus has been on developing mechanisms by which citizens can participate in making the science that comes to influence regulation, policy and political agendas

 

ballen@vt.edu

   

Sonja Schmid

Head shot of Sonja Schmid
Sonja Schmid, Science and Technology Studies

Sonja Schmid is an associate professor of Science and Technology Studies (STS), and serves as the co-director of the STS graduate program in Northern Virginia. For her first book, she studied the history and organization of the emerging Soviet nuclear industry. She traced the results of Soviet nuclear technology transfer to Central and East European nations that have since joined the European Union. She is particularly interested in examining the interface of national energy policies, technological choices, and nonproliferation concerns. For her most recent NSF-supported research project on the challenges of globalizing nuclear emergency response, she has worked with postdoctoral scholars Davide Orsini and Başak Saraç Lesavre, and has hosted a monthly speaker series (SIREN) supported by the Office of the Vice President for the National Capital Region. She teaches courses in social studies of technology, science and technology policy, socio-cultural studies of risk, energy policy, and nuclear nonproliferation. Together with the Nuclear Engineering Program and the School of Public and International Affairs, she developed and launched an interdisciplinary graduate certificate in "Nuclear Science, Technology, and Policy". The CEUTTSS offers her a prominent platform to advocate for and engage in international, in addition to interdisciplinary, collaboration in the nuclear field.

sschmid@vt.edu

 

Northern Virginia Center, 7054 Haycock Road, Suite 462, Falls Church, VA 22043

(703) 538-8482

Toni Calasanti

Head shot of Toni Calasanti
Toni Calasanti, Sociology, Center for Gerontology

Toni Calasanti works at the intersections of age, gender and social inequalities across different welfare state contexts. Her work has appeared in several journals as well as in such books as Gender, Social Inequalities, and Aging (2001), and Nobody’s Burden: Lessons from the Great Depression on the Struggle for Old-Age Security (2011). In addition to articles on Italy and Poland, she has published extensively with Finnish colleagues, comparing aspects of gender and aging across countries. Recent collaborative projects include a forthcoming edited book with Springer (with co-editors Marion Repetti from Switzerland and Christopher Phillipson from the UK), Ageing and Migration in a Global Context: Challenges for Welfare States.

She presently is engaged in a comparative study of retirees who migrate from European Union countries and the U.S. to poorer regions in Spain, Costa Rica, and Mexico; publications from this work have appeared in several international journals, and she has a related, co-authored (with Marion Repetti) book under contract with Policy Press titled Retirement Migration and Precarity in Later Life.

toni@vt.edu

   

 

Head shot of David Bieri
David Bieri, School of Public and International Affairs, Economics

David Bieri is an economist whose research examines “money and the metropolis," focusing on the joint evolutionary dynamics of urbanization and the development of the monetary–financial system. He also writes about regulatory aspects of international finance, global monetary governance, and the history of economic thought. Bieri is currently working on a book on the famous, but ignored German economist August Lösch and his role in the birth of modern spatial economics.

Prior to his work in the academy, Bieri held various senior positions in central banking at the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), in Basel, Switzerland and also worked as a high-yield analyst at Bankers Trust in London and in fixed-income syndication at UBS in Zürich. A Swiss native, he enjoys living in the Blue Ridge Mountains with his two daughters.

bieri@vt.edu

140 Otey Street

540.231.7361

Head shot of Ralph Buehler
Ralph Buehler, Chair, Urban Affairs and Planning.

Ralph Buehler is Professor and Chair of Urban Affairs and Planning in the School of Public and International Affairs at Virginia Tech’s Research Center in Arlington, VA. Most of his research has an transatlantic perspective, contrasting transport and land-use policies, transport systems, and travel behavior in Western Europe and North America. Ralph is the author or coauthor of over 70 articles in refereed academic journals, the book City Cycling (MIT Press), chapters in edited books, as well as reports to federal and local governments, NGOs, and for-profit industry organizations. Between 2012 and 2018, he served as chair of the Committee for Bicycle Transportation of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). His research interests include: (1) the influence of transport policy, land use, and socio-demographics on travel behavior; (2) active travel and public health; and (3) public transport demand, supply, regional coordination, and financial efficiency.

ralphbu@vt.edu

 

571.858.3111

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Joel Peters, Associate Director of Operations, NCR. School of Public and International Affairs - Government and International affairs Program

 

Joel Peters’ research interests and publications cover Israeli politics and foreign policy, the Arab-Israeli peace process, regional cooperation in the Middle East and Europe’s relations in the Middle East and the Mediterranean. He is the co-author (with Sharon Pardo) of Uneasy Neighbors: Israel and the European Union and Israel and the European Union A Documentary History. Peters is currently working on a book on Israeli foreign policy since the end of the Cold War.

 

 

peters25@vt.edu

Virginia Tech Research Center VTRC- 6-032A

571.858.3117

Head shot of Gerard Toal
Gerard Toal (Gearóid Ó Tuathail), Government and International Affairs in Arlington VA.

Gerard Toal (Gearóid Ó Tuathail) is the author and editor of seven books. Among them are Critical Geopolitics: The Politics of Writing Global Space, a foundational book in the field, Rethinking Geopolitics and two editions of The Geopolitical Reader. He has also written over a hundred peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters on territorial conflicts in Southeast Europe and Eurasia, US foreign policy, de facto states, and discourse analysis. His book Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and its Reversal won multiple awards. He is the recipient of multiple research grants from the US National Science Foundation (NSF) on the Balkans, post-Soviet Europe, Eurasia and the Caucasus. His book Near Abroad: Putin, the West and the Contest for Ukraine and the Caucasus (Oxford University Press) won the International Studies Association’s ENMIA Distinguished Book Award in 2019.

toalg@vt.edu

 

 

Clara Suong
Ali Mehrizi-Sani, Electrical Engineering.

Ali Mehrizi-Sani received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 2011. His areas of interest include power system applications of power electronics and integration of renewable energy resources. He serves as editor of a number of serials, including the IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, IEEE Power Engineering Letters, Energies, and MDPI Electronics and served as past editor of IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, and Wiley International Transactions on Electrical Energy Systems (ITEES). He was the Chair of IEEE Task Force on Dynamic System Equivalents and Secretary of CIGRE Working Group C4.34 on Application of PMUs for Monitoring Power System Dynamic Performance. He is the recipient of 2018 IEEE PES Outstanding Young Engineer Award, 2018 ASEE PNW Outstanding Teaching Award, 2017 IEEE Mac E. Van Valkenburg Early Career Teaching Award, 2017 WSU EECS Early Career Excellence in Research, 2016 WSU VCEA Reid Miller Excellence in Teaching Award, 2011 NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship, and 2007 Dennis Woodford prize. He was a Connaught Scholar at the University of Toronto from 2007 to 2011.

mehrizi@vt.edu

 



 

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Maria Snegovaya.

CEUTTSS Research Fellow Maria Snegovaya (Ph.D., Columbia University) is also a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Kellogg Center for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Virginia Tech, a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University, and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Atlantic Council. She specializes in comparative politics, international relations, and statistical methods. The key focus of her research is democratic backsliding in Eastern Europe, as well as Russia’s domestic and foreign policy. Her research results and analysis have appeared in policy and peer-reviewed journals, including West European Politics, Journal of Democracy, Post-Soviet Affairs, and the Washington Post‘s political science blog "The Monkey Cage." Her research has been referenced in publications such as the New York Times, Bloomberg, the Economist, and Foreign Policy.  

ms4391@columbia.edu

 



 

Clara Suong
Clara Suong, Political Science. Deputy Director Tech4Humanity Lab, Research Associate, Center for the Humanities.

Clara H. Suong studies the role of information and technology in international relations, using computational, formal, and experimental methods. She received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, San Diego and completed postdoctoral training at NYU and Duke University. Her work has been published in the Presidential Studies Quarterly, Conflict Management and Peace Science, Brazilian Political Science Review, and Cornell University Press, and has received support from the U.S. National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Defense, and USAID.

clara.suong@vt.edu

 



 

head shot of Maria Snegovaya
Dmitris Tsarouhas

Dmitris Tsarouhas is Associate Professor at the Department of International Relations, Bilkent University, Turkey, Adjunct Professor at George Washington University, and a Visiting Researcher at the Walsh School of Foreign Service, BMW Center for German and European Studies, Georgetown University. He is also a non-resident Senior Research Fellow at the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP), a Scientific Board Member of the Foundation for European progressive Studies (FEPS) and a consultant for the World Bank. His research has been published in journals such as Journal of European Integration, Regulation & Governance, New Political Economy, Public Administration, Comparative European Politics, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, European Journal of Industrial Relations, Social Politics, Social Policy & Administration, Political Studies Review and Armed Forces & Society. He is the author of Social Democracy in Sweden: the threat from a globalized world (London and New York: IB Tauris 2008) and co-editor of Bridging the Real Divide: Social and Regional Policy in Turkey’s EU Accession Process (Ankara: METU Press). His latest book, co-edited with Owen Parker is entitled Crisis in the Eurozone Periphery: The Political Economies of Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland (London: Palgrave 2018).

 

 



 

Michael Alexander is an Adjunct Professor in History. He teaches late medieval to early modern Europe, especially Italy and England.

alexanmj@vt.edu

   

 

Jon Catherwood-Ginn

Medium shot of Jon Catherwood-Ginn
Jon Catherwood-Ginn, Moss Arts Center

Jon Catherwood-Ginn serves as the associate director of programming at the Moss Arts Center at Virginia Tech. In that capacity, he has collaborated with MacArthur Fellows, Obie-, Tony-, National Book and Grammy Award-winners in the development of educational programs and new works.

As an educator, arts leader, and applied theatre artist, Jon has worked in domains as diverse as urban public schools, Off-Broadway theatre companies, national service organizations, regional planning commissions, juvenile detention centers, and Research I universities. He was an inaugural member of the Association of Performing Arts Professionals’ (APAP) Leadership Fellows program. As an artist, reviewer, and consultant, Jon has worked with the Intercultural Leadership Institute, APAP, New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Pennsylvania Humanities Council, Sojourn Theatre, The TEAM, Lost Nation Theatre, Hamilton-Gibson Productions, Extant Arts Company, and Aquila Theatre. Projects Jon has led in arts-based community engagement, collaborative programming, and equity have been featured at conferences by the Engagement Scholarship Consortium, Network of Ensemble Theaters, Imagining America, APAP, Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities, International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, and Association of American Colleges & Universities. His writings have been published in Arts and Community Change: Exploring Cultural Development Policies, Practices and Dilemmas (Routledge Press, 2015) and Animating Democracy’s “A Working Guide to the Landscape of Arts for Change” series. A graduate of Bucknell University (B.A.) and Virginia Tech (M.F.A.), Jon is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Planning, Governance, & Globalization at VT. In addition to his service on the arts and culture committee of the Center for European Union, Transatlantic & Trans-European Space Studies (CEUTTSS), Jon is an affiliate faculty of the Center for Refugee, Migrant, and Displacement Studies.

rjginn@vt.edu

   

 

E. Thomas Ewing

Head shot of E. Thomas Ewing
E. Thomas Ewing, History, CLAHS

E. Thomas Ewing is a Professor of History and Associate Dean for Research in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. He specializes in Russia, modern Europe, the Cold War, and the History of Medicine.

Scotty Hardwig

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Scotty Hardwig, SOPA

Scotty Hardwig is a movement artist, performer, and teacher originally from southwest Virginia. His research practice stems from the confluence of sensory media and the moving body, creating movement-based artwork through live performance, installation/site-specific, and cinematic frames. As a freelance performer and company member of AXIS Dance Company, he has had the honor of working with internationally recognized choreographers like Marc Brew, Stephen Koester, Johannes Wieland, Joe Goode, Amy Seiwart, Eric Handman, Yannis Adoniou, Satu Hummasti, Stephan Koplowitz, Damien Muñoz, and Virginia Garcia. As a choreographer, his processes are collaborative, experimental, and queer, investigating the existential in-between spaces of meaning and metaphor inherent to the human body in motion. He has created stage works for companies like the National Ballet of Ecuador (EC), LEVYdance (San Francisco, CA), La Revuelta Laboratorio Escénico (MX), the Dance Company of Middlebury (Vermont), and with his own collaborative teams under the moniker anatomy zero. Recent projects include Body, Full of Time (2019), Time Garden (2019-2020), ENGRAM 4 (2020), and Cloud City Collage (2021), which all investigate the chimeric relationship between digital and physical versions of self. Using motion capture technologies, immersive sound, animation, and virtual and augmented reality, these research works exist at the intersection of humanity and the digital.

James Jewitt

James Jewitt
James Jewitt, SOVA

James R. Jewitt is Collegiate Associate Professor in the School of Visual Arts and Chair of the interdisciplinary Visual Arts Minor. He received his Ph.D. in the history of art and architecture, as well as Advanced Certificate in Medieval and Renaissance Studies, from the University of Pittsburgh. His research focuses on art in early modern Europe, with particular emphasis on the collection and display of paintings in Italy and France. His articles on Titian, Dosso Dossi, and Nicolas Poussin, among others, have appeared in The Burlington Magazine and Artibus et Historiae. Dr. Jewitt routinely shares his research at the College Art Association, SECAC, Renaissance Society of America, and Association for General and Liberal Studies.

Jewitt teaches the gateway and capstone courses for the Visual Arts Minor. His other teaching areas include the history of art and architecture in the medieval and early modern periods, the history of collecting, and art history theory and methodologies.

jjewitt@vt.edu

   

 

Audrey Reeves

Audrey Reeves
Audrey Reeves, Political Science, ASPECT

Audrey Reeves is an assistant professor of political science and core faculty for ASPECT at Virginia Tech. Her research draws on feminist perspectives on embodiment and affect and deploys them in the field of International Relations. She has published on women, peace and security in the aftermath of Europe's refugee crisis; feminist activism at memorial sites in Europe and the US; and the governance of affect at heritage sites in the UK and Israel. This latter research is informed by her longstanding interest in the performing arts, which increasingly inform memorialization practices.

audreyreeves@vt.edu

   

 

Vinodh Venkatesh

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Vinodh Venkatesh, Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Vinodh Venkatesh is Professor of Spanish and the author of three books: Capitán Latinoamérica: Superheroes in Cinema, Television, and Web Series (SUNY P, 2020), New Maricón Cinema: Outing Latin American Film (U of Texas P, 2016), and The Body as Capital: Masculinities in Contemporary Latin American Fiction (U of Arizona P, 2015). He has also co-edited with María del Carmen Caña Jiménez Horacio Castellanos Moya: El diablo en el espejo (Albatros, 2016).  

Venkatesh has published multiple articles on Spanish cinema, and is currently working on a broader project on the aesthetics of the sublime in contemporary Spanish culture. 

Venkatesh serves on the editorial boards of Chasqui, Journal of Men’s Studies, Hispanófila, Romance Notes, Journal of Bodies, Sexualities, and Masculinities, and MIFLC Review.

vinodhv@vt.edu

   

 

Janell Watson
Janell Watson, Chair, Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Janell Watson is professor of French and chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. A specialist in French theory, she is the author of Guattari’s Diagrammatic Thought: Writing between Deleuze and Lacan (Continuum 2009), a co-author of The Deleuze and Guattari Dictionary (Bloomsbury 2013), and is completing a book-length study of Michel Serres. She is also author of Literature and Material Culture from Balzac to Proust: The Collection and Consumption of Curiosities (Cambridge 1999), and editor of the minnesota review: a journal of creative and critical writing (Duke

rjwatson@vt.edu

 



 

Jo Wolf is an Instructor in History and Religion and Culture. They specialize in Medieval History, Legal History, Church History, Queer History, Northern European Vernaculars, Celtic
Studies,  and Digital Methods.

joewolf@vt.edu

   

 

Aislinn McCann is a PhD student in the Planning, Governance & Globalization program in the School of Public and International Affairs at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on global governance, international organizations, and Internet governance. As Communications Officer for CEUTTSS, she works as part of the communications team to coordinate, promote, and amplify research, outreach, and educational content. Since 2018, Aislinn has also acted as the Steger Center Fellow for the “European Affairs in a Global Context” study abroad program for Department of Political Science at Virginia Tech, in which role she accompanies a cohort of students to the Steger Center for International Scholarship, a key overseas location for CEUTTSS programming, during fall semesters. While abroad, she teaches about issues of nationalism, fascism, and authoritarianism in Europe. When she is at Virginia Tech’s primary campus in Blacksburg, Virginia, she teaches courses on International Relations and global order

Janell Watson
Austin Litchford, (PSCI) Communications Intern.

Austin Litchford is a Political Science major with a focus on National Security. He plans on graduating in 2023. He jumped at the opportunity to participate in creating this new Center from the ground up. As Communications Intern, Austin creates content for and helps manage the social media accounts for the Center.  

Janell Watson
Lauren Melton, (COMM), CLAHS Ambassador for the Center.

Lauren Melton is an Ambassador for the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, who is providing support for the Center in 2021. She majors in Communication Science and Social Inquiry and minors in National Security and Foreign Affairs. Lauren intends to work in advertising and/or public service after graduation. Lauren helps manage our social media accounts and works with students interested in adding the new major and minors, which allows her to engage her passion for writing and creating visual forms of media.