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Events Calendar

Upcoming Events

  • 02/06/2023 5:00 PM - 11:59 PM 329 Major Williams Hall VT Camino Please join us for an information session about VT Camino, a Summer I study-abroad program where we hike over 200 miles on the Camino de Santiago in Spain with fellow Hokies and pilgrims from all over the world. After the pilgrimage, we spend 2 weeks at the University of Santiago de Compostela taking Spanish classes. The program is 6 credits; 3 can count for Spanish major/minor credits and can also count for meeting language requirements. Open to all majors. For more information and to start an application, click "more information" below. Admission is rolling and scholarships are available.
  • 02/06/2023 6:00 PM - 11:59 PM Zoom VT Camino Please join us for an information session about VT Camino, a Summer I study-abroad program where we hike over 200 miles on the Camino de Santiago in Spain with fellow Hokies and pilgrims from all over the world. After the pilgrimage, we spend 2 weeks at the University of Santiago de Compostela taking Spanish classes. The program is 6 credits; 3 can count for Spanish major/minor credits and can also count for meeting language requirements. Open to all majors. For more information and to start an application, please click "more information" below. Admission is rolling and scholarships are available. Use the Zoom link: https://virginiatech.zoom.us/my/ahesp
  • 02/07/2023 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Zoom A talk with the Hungarian Ambassador to the US Please join us in welcoming His Excellency, Szabolcs Takacs, Ambassador of Hungary to the United States. HE will be delivering our first ambassador talk of 2023, regarding recent developments in Hungary's transatlantic relationship with a focus on the Ukraine war, the energy crisis, and economic cooperation. In this context, His Excellency would also like to touch on the Hungarian government's stance on interests in other fields, such as religious freedom issues. This will be followed by a Q&A session Moderated by Dr Georgeta Pourchot. The talk will be available free over Zoom with registration, and is open to all who would like to join.
  • 02/07/2023 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Kellogg Center Conference Room (820 University City Blvd) PPE Reading Group: Democracy for Realists This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels' Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government (2016). Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels employ a wealth of social-scientific evidence to show that the familiar ideal of thoughtful citizens steering the ship of state from the voting booth is fundamentally misguided. They demonstrate that voters - even those who are well-informed and politically engaged - mostly choose parties and candidates on the basis of social identities and partisan loyalties, not political issues. They also show that voters adjust their policy views and even their perceptions of basic matters of fact to match those loyalties. When parties are roughly evenly matched, elections often turn on irrelevant or misleading considerations such as economic spurts or downturns beyond the incumbents' control; the outcomes are essentially random. Thus, voters do not control the course of public policy, even indirectly. These empirical findings provide a powerful challenge to conventional thinking, pointing the way toward a fundamentally different understanding of the realities and potential of democratic government. Achen and Bartels conclude that democratic theory needs to be founded on identity groups and political parties, not on the preferences of individual voters. The reading group is (provisionally) scheduled for every other Tuesday from 4-5:30pm in the conference room of the Kellogg Center (820 University City Blvd). Participation is open to students (whether you are already a PPE student or interested in becoming one) and select faculty. Please sign up with Dan Gibbs (gibbsd@vt.edu) to receive your book in time to read. Enjoy free pizza and soft drinks with our discussions!
  • 02/08/2023 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM Virtual Take the Lead Local Government Career Fair Join us for the inaugural College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences Local Government Career Fair, featured as part of our Take the Lead series. The fair will be hosted virtually via the Brazen platform, with an opportunity to engage with local governments across the Commonwealth of Virginia. To register and learn more about the participating localities, visit liberalarts.vt.edu/careerfair.
  • 02/09/2023 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM Kellogg Center Conference Room (820 University City Blvd) PPE Working Paper Series: Nicolaus Tideman Nicolaus Tideman, an affiliated faculty member of the Kellogg Center for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics and a faculty member in the Department of Economics at Virginia Tech, will give a talk with the title "The Importance of Condorcet Consistency in Preserving Democracy." All faculty and students are welcome to attend. Lunch will be served! The PPE Working Paper Series offers a friendly and constructive intellectual environment for sharing and advancing preliminary research in PPE with interested undergraduate and graduate students.
  • 02/09/2023 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM Shanks Hall 370/380 ASPECT Book Event ASPECT will host an ASPECT Books session on Thursday, February 9, from 1:00 to 3:00 pm. This session will be in-person in Shanks Hall, Rm. 370/80. This ASPECT Books session will feature two ASPECT Affiliates -- Rebecca Hester (STS) and Andrew Wadoski (English) -- as well as ASPECT Director Brian Britt (Religion & Culture), each presenting on their recently authored books. Brian Britt, Religion Around Walter Benjamin Rebecca Hester, Embodied Politics Indigenous Migrant Activism, Cultural Competency, and Health Promotion in California Andrew Wadoski, Spenser's Ethics: Empire, Mutability, and Moral Philosophy in Early Modernity
  • 02/10/2023 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Architecture Annex 111 & Zoom Get Out There with SPIA! Off Campus and Summer & Opportunities Open House Free Food Provided!
  • 02/10/2023 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Norris Hall, Room 209 STEP Spring Seminar The weekly STEP seminar provides a space for informative presentations and discussions around work at the science-policy interface. students may register for credit, the seminar is open to all VT community members; we very much welcome faculty/staff and students from any an all disciplines. Seminar Title: Shaping policy with scientific activism Lecturer: Peter Lurie, President, Center for Science in the Public Interest All sessions take place in Norris Hall room 209 and via Zoom at https://virginiatech.zoom.us/j/81074678605
  • 02/10/2023 1:00 PM - 5:30 PM University Club Summit on Invasive Species More information: https://vtx.vt.edu/notices/2023/01/20230131_notice_vt_summit_on_invasive_species_.html Registration: https://virginiatech.questionpro.com/t/AVSTFZwWYK Virginia Tech's Global Change Center-affiliated Invasive Species Working Group was recently selected as one of four teams to develop Phase II Proposals for the ambitious Destination Area 2.0 call. A key step in developing the Phase II proposal is engaging with folks across campus who are directly or indirectly working on invasives. To this end, we will be holding the VT Summit on Invasive Species. The summit will be held at the University Culb at Lane Stadium on February 10th from 1 to 4 p.m., followed by a reception from 4-5:30 p.m. We will provide drinks and snacks during the summit, and appetizers, and cash bar at the reception. The summit is open to grad students, postdocs, faculty, and staff with an interest in invasive species.
  • 02/10/2023 1:30 PM - 11:59 PM Newman Library Athenaeum STS Seminar Series Stever Morton (VT)- "Astronaut Health at Risk: How Science, Culture, and Uncertainty Shape Knowledge of Health Harms at NASA" (Dissertation Seminar)
  • 02/15/2023 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM GLC Multipurpose Room (Graduate Life Center) PPE Research Speaker Series: Malte Dold Malte Dold from Pomona College will give a talk with the title "Hayekian Psychological Economics and Its Normative Implications." The talk is tailored to appeal to both students and faculty, with plenty of time for discussion and interaction with the guest speaker. All faculty and students are welcome to attend.
  • 02/17/2023 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Norris Hall, Room 209 STEP Spring Seminar The weekly STEP seminar provides a space for informative presentations and discussions around work at the science-policy interface. students may register for credit, the seminar is open to all VT community members; we very much welcome faculty/staff and students from any and all disciplines. Seminar Title: Using modeling and social science to shape environmental social policy Lecturer: Theodore Lim, Assistant Professor, Urban Affairs & Planning, Virginia Tech School of Public & International Affairs All sessions take place in Norris Hall room 209 and via Zoom at https://virginiatech.zoom.us/j/81074678605
  • 02/17/2023 1:30 PM - 11:59 PM Newman Library Athenaeum STS Seminar Series Linda Jantzen (National Defense University)- "Operationalizing Data Culture in the US Army: 1961-2021" (Dissertation Seminar)
  • 02/20/2023 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Holtzman 2nd Floor Board Room VT Humanities Week: Book Discussion on The Bright Ages Virginia Tech Professor Matthew Gabriele joins his coauthor David Perry to discuss their recently published book The Bright Ages: A New History of Medieval Europe. Join these authors as they shed light on surprising aspects the socalled European Middle Ages, from the varieties of religious traditions to fascinating histories of war to the rule of queens.
  • 02/21/2023 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM North End Center, Room 2420/2430 VT Humanities Week Talk: Humanities Unlocked: Education for Incarcerated Students This discussion about the Humanities for All: Prison Learning Initiative will be moderated by Margaret Breslau, Co-founder of the Virginia Prison Justice Network.
  • 02/21/2023 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Kellogg Center Conference Room (820 University City Blvd) PPE Reading Group: Democracy for Realists This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels' Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government (2016). Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels employ a wealth of social-scientific evidence to show that the familiar ideal of thoughtful citizens steering the ship of state from the voting booth is fundamentally misguided. They demonstrate that voters - even those who are well-informed and politically engaged - mostly choose parties and candidates on the basis of social identities and partisan loyalties, not political issues. They also show that voters adjust their policy views and even their perceptions of basic matters of fact to match those loyalties. When parties are roughly evenly matched, elections often turn on irrelevant or misleading considerations such as economic spurts or downturns beyond the incumbents' control; the outcomes are essentially random. Thus, voters do not control the course of public policy, even indirectly. These empirical findings provide a powerful challenge to conventional thinking, pointing the way toward a fundamentally different understanding of the realities and potential of democratic government. Achen and Bartels conclude that democratic theory needs to be founded on identity groups and political parties, not on the preferences of individual voters. The reading group is (provisionally) scheduled for every other Tuesday from 4-5:30pm in the conference room of the Kellogg Center (820 University City Blvd). Participation is open to students (whether you are already a PPE student or interested in becoming one) and select faculty. Please sign up with Dan Gibbs (gibbsd@vt.edu) to receive your book in time to read. Enjoy free pizza and soft drinks with our discussions!
  • 02/21/2023 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM Moss Arts Center, 190 Alumni Mall Giovanni-Steger Poetry Prize Ceremony
  • 02/21/2023 7:00 PM - 8:15 PM Online At War with King Alcohol: Debating Drinking and Masculinity in the Civil War A free online lecture and discussion with Dr. Megan Bever. Learn how Civil War soldiers and officers debated the compatibility of alcohol and patriotism--and whether the civilian population agreed. This lecture is sponsored by the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies.
  • 02/22/2023 12:30 PM - 11:59 PM Torgersen Rm. 3310 VT Humanities Week Talk: Open Access and the Humanities: Making Sense of a Sea Change in Scholarly Publishing The open access movement has been around for decades but only recently has it gained a foothold in the humanities. How should we assess this development? Should all humanities scholarship be OA? This roundtable brings together Virginia Tech faculty who have successfully published their work in a variety of OA venues to share what they have learned from their experiences and consider what the future holds. Q&A is encouraged.
  • 02/22/2023 1:00 PM - 11:59 PM Major Williams 225 VT Humanities Week: Is Technology Value-Laden? Joseph Pitt, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Philosophy, will speak about whether technology is value laden by examining some of the pros and cons, and then suggesting a third option. It is people who have values which are seen in terms of the actions people undertake. This then raises the issue of, which values should people act upon. Pitts answer is that individuals need to engage others to bring about a world which exhibits their common vision and this is what the humanities force us to face.
  • 02/22/2023 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Holtzman Assembly Hall VT Humanities Week: Humanities and the Future of our Politics How did we get here? Where do we go from here? Michael Slaby, a major architect of digital media for communicating ideas in politics, has written with circumspection about the failed promises of social media to democratize public expression. What lessons have we learned from the past decade of digital technology and public discourse? What challenges will the future bring? Join us as Slaby explains the role of humanities in securing the future of American democracy and the public sphere.
  • 02/23/2023 4:00 PM - 11:59 PM Newman Library Rm. 101S VT Humanities Week: US History in 10: Foods, Animals, and Laborers How might we see history differently if we looked at it through new lenses? In this panel, four presenters will each share 10 slides in 10 minutes, telling stories of foods, wild animals, condiments, and technological workers that can make us rethink US History and the people, foods, and environments of which it is comprised. The talks will be engaging, fast-paced, and accessible entry points for anyone to think about our past in new ways. Theme appropriate refreshments will be served.
  • 02/23/2023 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM Graduate Life Center - 5:30pm Reception in the Multipurpose Room -7:00pm Program in Auditorium VT Humanities Week Marquee Panel: Humanities and the Future of Technology Scott Hartley, a successful technology entrepreneur and Silicon Valley expert, has literally written the book when it comes to the urgency of humanities in a technological world. In a dynamic conversation with Laura Belmonte, the dean of the Virginia Tech College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, Hartley draws on his experience in developing and leading the innovation economy to explain why the liberal arts will rule the digital world and why the knowledge and skills that the humanities cultivate is vital to the future of talent in an innovation economy.
  • 02/23/2023 6:00 PM - 11:59 PM Blacksburg Library This Is Not A Scam! Adults 60 and older are heavily and disproportionately affected by cyber scams. Cyber scams are specific types of fraud committed online, designed to exploit age-associated vulnerabilities, by offenders unknown to the victims, inciting fear, shame, and mental health problems, on top of the financial loss suffered. Individuals 60 and older are overrepresented among victims of cyber scams, both in number, and total financial loss. Yet, most cyber scams stay unreported. This interactive theatre piece creates an immersive experience that involves the audience in the storytelling. Interactive theatre is a highly useful tool to prevent and intervene in criminal activities such as cyber scams. Please join us and attend one or multiple performances to learn about scams! Note: In order to evaluate the program, the audience will be asked to fill out a short survey after the show. Online and printed versions will be available. Show running time will be 50-60 minutes, depending on audience interaction. Registration is free but required. Please register by sending an email to research assistant Sophia Silis at thisisnotascamtheater@gmail.com or through this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScAGYD6XOzNSfsxeQhlQnNEUwsV9lGNziXlo1kwMarxIwXRWw/viewform
  • 02/24/2023 1:30 PM - 11:59 PM Newman Library Athenaeum STS Seminar Series Homero Murzi (VT) - "Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Amplifying the Voice of Our Students"
  • 02/24/2023 2:00 PM - 11:59 PM Zoom Ukraine and Russia: One Year Later Please join CEUTTSS and our expert panel as they evaluate how the Russia - Ukraine war has evolved over the past 12 months, and offer reflections on the geo-strategic implications of this conflict, to include Ukrainian resilience and resistance to occupation, allied responses, and realistic prognosis for an end to the war. Panelists include McGill University and Jean Monnet Centre Montreal's Scientific co-director, Maria Popova, University of Greenwich's senior lecturer in Political Economy, Dr. Yuliya Yurchenko, Tech4Humanity Lab director Dr. Aaron Brantly of Virginia Tech, and CEUTTSS Associate Director of Strategic Initiatives at Virginia Tech, Dr. Georgeta Pourchot. CEUTTSS deputy director, Dr. Besnik Pula, will provide an introduction.
  • 02/24/2023 3:00 PM - 11:59 PM Warm Hearth Village This Is Not A Scam! Adults 60 and older are heavily and disproportionately affected by cyber scams. Cyber scams are specific types of fraud committed online, designed to exploit age-associated vulnerabilities, by offenders unknown to the victims, inciting fear, shame, and mental health problems, on top of the financial loss suffered. Individuals 60 and older are overrepresented among victims of cyber scams, both in number, and total financial loss. Yet, most cyber scams stay unreported. This interactive theatre piece creates an immersive experience that involves the audience in the storytelling. Interactive theatre is a highly useful tool to prevent and intervene in criminal activities such as cyber scams. Please join us and attend one or multiple performances to learn about scams! Note: In order to evaluate the program, the audience will be asked to fill out a short survey after the show. Online and printed versions will be available. Show running time will be 50-60 minutes, depending on audience interaction. Registration is free but required. Please register by sending an email to research assistant Sophia Silis at thisisnotascamtheater@gmail.com or via this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScAGYD6XOzNSfsxeQhlQnNEUwsV9lGNziXlo1kwMarxIwXRWw/viewform
  • 02/24/2023 4:00 PM - 4:00 PM Major Williams atrium (ground level, quad side) Kaffeeklatsch Join the German program for its once-a-month Kaffeeklatsch; come for the entire hour or only for a few minutes. Take a break from studying or working and chat in German with friends, fellow students, and professors.
  • 02/24/2023 6:00 PM - 11:59 PM Warm Hearth Village This Is Not A Scam! Adults 60 and older are heavily and disproportionately affected by cyber scams. Cyber scams are specific types of fraud committed online, designed to exploit age-associated vulnerabilities, by offenders unknown to the victims, inciting fear, shame, and mental health problems, on top of the financial loss suffered. Individuals 60 and older are overrepresented among victims of cyber scams, both in number, and total financial loss. Yet, most cyber scams stay unreported. This interactive theatre piece creates an immersive experience that involves the audience in the storytelling. Interactive theatre is a highly useful tool to prevent and intervene in criminal activities such as cyber scams. Please join us and attend one or multiple performances to learn about scams! Note: In order to evaluate the program, the audience will be asked to fill out a short survey after the show. Online and printed versions will be available. Show running time will be 50-60 minutes, depending on audience interaction. Registration is free but required. Please register by sending an email to research assistant Sophia Silis at thisisnotascamtheater@gmail.com or via this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScAGYD6XOzNSfsxeQhlQnNEUwsV9lGNziXlo1kwMarxIwXRWw/viewform
  • 02/25/2023 2:00 PM - 11:59 PM English Meadows This Is Not A Scam! Adults 60 and older are heavily and disproportionately affected by cyber scams. Cyber scams are specific types of fraud committed online, designed to exploit age-associated vulnerabilities, by offenders unknown to the victims, inciting fear, shame, and mental health problems, on top of the financial loss suffered. Individuals 60 and older are overrepresented among victims of cyber scams, both in number, and total financial loss. Yet, most cyber scams stay unreported. This interactive theatre piece creates an immersive experience that involves the audience in the storytelling. Interactive theatre is a highly useful tool to prevent and intervene in criminal activities such as cyber scams. Please join us and attend one or multiple performances to learn about scams! Note: In order to evaluate the program, the audience will be asked to fill out a short survey after the show. Online and printed versions will be available. Show running time will be 50-60 minutes, depending on audience interaction. Registration is free but required. Please register by sending an email to research assistant Sophia Silis at thisisnotascamtheater@gmail.com or via this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScAGYD6XOzNSfsxeQhlQnNEUwsV9lGNziXlo1kwMarxIwXRWw/viewform
  • 02/27/2023 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Major Williams 434 German Program Information Meeting This meeting is for undergraduates interested in learning more about the German program at Virginia Tech. Information will be provided regarding the German major and minor, courses next academic year, study abroad and internship abroad opportunities, and activities such as the German Culture Club, Teach for Jamie, and Kaffeeklatsch. German professors and advanced students will be available to answer your questions.
  • 02/27/2023 6:00 PM - 11:59 PM Christiansburg Library This Is Not A Scam! Adults 60 and older are heavily and disproportionately affected by cyber scams. Cyber scams are specific types of fraud committed online, designed to exploit age-associated vulnerabilities, by offenders unknown to the victims, inciting fear, shame, and mental health problems, on top of the financial loss suffered. Individuals 60 and older are overrepresented among victims of cyber scams, both in number, and total financial loss. Yet, most cyber scams stay unreported. This interactive theatre piece creates an immersive experience that involves the audience in the storytelling. Interactive theatre is a highly useful tool to prevent and intervene in criminal activities such as cyber scams. Please join us and attend one or multiple performances to learn about scams! Note: In order to evaluate the program, the audience will be asked to fill out a short survey after the show. Online and printed versions will be available. Show running time will be 50-60 minutes, depending on audience interaction. Registration is free but required. Please register by sending an email to research assistant Sophia Silis at thisisnotascamtheater@gmail.com or via this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScAGYD6XOzNSfsxeQhlQnNEUwsV9lGNziXlo1kwMarxIwXRWw/viewform
  • 02/28/2023 6:30 PM - 11:59 PM Theatre 101 Virginia Tech This Is Not A Scam! Adults 60 and older are heavily and disproportionately affected by cyber scams. Cyber scams are specific types of fraud committed online, designed to exploit age-associated vulnerabilities, by offenders unknown to the victims, inciting fear, shame, and mental health problems, on top of the financial loss suffered. Individuals 60 and older are overrepresented among victims of cyber scams, both in number, and total financial loss. Yet, most cyber scams stay unreported. This interactive theatre piece creates an immersive experience that involves the audience in the storytelling. Interactive theatre is a highly useful tool to prevent and intervene in criminal activities such as cyber scams. Please join us and attend one or multiple performances to learn about scams! Note: In order to evaluate the program, the audience will be asked to fill out a short survey after the show. Online and printed versions will be available. Show running time will be 50-60 minutes, depending on audience interaction. Registration is free but required. Please register by sending an email to research assistant Sophia Silis at thisisnotascamtheater@gmail.com or via this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScAGYD6XOzNSfsxeQhlQnNEUwsV9lGNziXlo1kwMarxIwXRWw/viewform
  • 03/03/2023 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM Indigenous Knowledges Meet Internet Infrastructure: A Design Justice Approach You are invited to join a livestream interview with Fernanda Rosa, Center for Humanities Research Associate for the 2022-2023 academic year, which will be live on the Center for Humanities YouTube page (https://www.youtube.com/@virginiatechcenterforhuman8813/streams) Synopsis: In this presentation, the goal is to problematize the design of internet interconnection infrastructure with Indigenous knowledges. Internet interconnection is what makes a network of networks possible, allowing our data to circulate online through paths that cross cables, data centers that we do not necessarily know where they are located. Network interconnection design is based on commercial values that neglect and prevent the participation of indigenous networks (Rosa, 2021), while being economically strategic for big tech to store their data in content delivery networks (CDNs) (Rosa and Hauge 2021) and be accessible to numerous users and networks at once. Considering that a more inclusive design in internet interconnection is possible, which values should shape this architecture? How different should they be to correspond to Indigenous practices and design experiences, specially Tseltal and Zapoteco people? This presentation will make the case for alternative communication architectures to express the practice of design justice in internet infrastructure.
  • 03/03/2023 1:30 PM - 11:59 PM Newman Library Athenaeum STS Seminar Series Alice Fox (VT)- "Quitting Digital Narratives of Violence and Abuse" (Dissertation Seminar)
  • 03/15/2023 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM Anne and Ellen Fife Theatre (Moss Arts Center) PPE Distinguished Public Lecture: Kwame Anthony Appiah Award-winning philosopher, cultural theorist, and novelist Kwame Anthony Appiah will deliver the 2023 PPE Distinguished Public Lecture at Virginia Tech. Kwame Anthony Appiah is Professor of Philosophy and Law at New York University. He has published widely in literary and cultural studies, with a focus on African and African-American culture. Among many other honors, Professor Appiah won the Ralph J. Bunche Award of the American Political Association "for the best scholarly work in political science which explores the phenomenon of ethnic and cultural pluralism," the Outstanding Book Prize of the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights, and the Arthur Ross Book Award of the Council on Foreign Relations. At Virginia Tech, drawing from his work on cosmopolitanism and identity, Professor Appiah will first explore the idea of identity philosophically, then focus on the psychology of identity and the challenges of managing identities in a humane way. He will examine how partisan identity works in our own society today, and end by discussing the role of identities across the world, defending the continuing relevance of a cosmopolitan respect for the diversity of identities, an attitude that is very much under attack. His lecture is titled, "Politics and Polarization: The Place of Identities in Democracy." All faculty, students, and members of the public are welcome to attend this lecture. The event is free with no tickets required. The lecture will be followed by a public reception.
  • 03/16/2023 5:30 PM - 6:45 PM 334 Major Williams Hall Women's Executive Leadership in Europe Please join us for CEUTTSS' next installation of the Gender Equity Series: Women's Executive Leadership in Europe. Guest speakers are Dr. Louise Davidson-Schmich, Professor of Political Science at the University of Miami, and Dr. Malliga Och, Associate Professor of Global Studies at Idaho State University. This talk will be moderated by the Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences at Virginia Tech, Dr. Farida Jalalzai. The event is free and in person, and seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • 03/21/2023 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Kellogg Center Conference Room (820 University City Blvd) PPE Reading Group: Democracy for Realists This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels' Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government (2016). Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels employ a wealth of social-scientific evidence to show that the familiar ideal of thoughtful citizens steering the ship of state from the voting booth is fundamentally misguided. They demonstrate that voters - even those who are well-informed and politically engaged - mostly choose parties and candidates on the basis of social identities and partisan loyalties, not political issues. They also show that voters adjust their policy views and even their perceptions of basic matters of fact to match those loyalties. When parties are roughly evenly matched, elections often turn on irrelevant or misleading considerations such as economic spurts or downturns beyond the incumbents' control; the outcomes are essentially random. Thus, voters do not control the course of public policy, even indirectly. These empirical findings provide a powerful challenge to conventional thinking, pointing the way toward a fundamentally different understanding of the realities and potential of democratic government. Achen and Bartels conclude that democratic theory needs to be founded on identity groups and political parties, not on the preferences of individual voters. The reading group is (provisionally) scheduled for every other Tuesday from 4-5:30pm in the conference room of the Kellogg Center (820 University City Blvd). Participation is open to students (whether you are already a PPE student or interested in becoming one) and select faculty. Please sign up with Dan Gibbs (gibbsd@vt.edu) to receive your book in time to read. Enjoy free pizza and soft drinks with our discussions!
  • 03/24/2023 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Major Williams atrium (ground level, quad side) Kaffeeklatsch Join the German program for its once-a-month Kaffeeklatsch; come for the entire hour or only for a few minutes. Take a break from studying or working and chat in German with friends, fellow students, and professors.
  • 03/30/2023 1:30 PM - 11:59 PM Newman Library Athenaeum STS Seminar Series Banu Subramanian (University of Massachusetts - Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) Title- TBA
  • 03/30/2023 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Mutual aid amidst militarization: Visions of anarchist abolitions futures for the United States You are invited to join a livestream interview with Dr. Priya Dixit, Center for Humanities Research Associate for the 2022-2023 academic year, which will be live on the Center for Humanities YouTube page (https://www.youtube.com/@virginiatechcenterforhuman8813/streams) Synopsis: It is well known that the United States is one of the most militarized countries in the world. Its military spending far surpasses its peers. Domestically, there are multiple levels of armed law enforcement with often overlapping authority. Civilian ownership of guns in the United States is higher than elsewhere as the US is the only country where there are more guns than people. It is difficult to conceptualize safety for communities and society in the context of this ongoing militarization of society. Here, I utilize the practices of prefigurative politics and mutual aid drawn from abolitionist and anarchist political thought and connect these to contemporary examples drawn from fieldwork experiences in Appalachia. In doing so, I theorize and imagine futures that are connected to anarchist and abolitionist theories of the state, violence, and the role of the individual. Overall, an anarchist abolitionist approach calls for anti statist, mutual-aid based practices to prevent and counter harm to communities. In contrast to militarized politics which centers the state and its use of force, an anarchist abolitionist approach illustrates how safety and security can be reimagined and re-made in the face of increasing militarization and state violence.
  • 04/04/2023 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Kellogg Center Conference Room (820 University City Blvd) PPE Reading Group: Democracy for Realists This semester, the PPE Reading Group will discuss Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels' Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government (2016). Christopher Achen and Larry Bartels employ a wealth of social-scientific evidence to show that the familiar ideal of thoughtful citizens steering the ship of state from the voting booth is fundamentally misguided. They demonstrate that voters - even those who are well-informed and politically engaged - mostly choose parties and candidates on the basis of social identities and partisan loyalties, not political issues. They also show that voters adjust their policy views and even their perceptions of basic matters of fact to match those loyalties. When parties are roughly evenly matched, elections often turn on irrelevant or misleading considerations such as economic spurts or downturns beyond the incumbents' control; the outcomes are essentially random. Thus, voters do not control the course of public policy, even indirectly. These empirical findings provide a powerful challenge to conventional thinking, pointing the way toward a fundamentally different understanding of the realities and potential of democratic government. Achen and Bartels conclude that democratic theory needs to be founded on identity groups and political parties, not on the preferences of individual voters. The reading group is (provisionally) scheduled for every other Tuesday from 4-5:30pm in the conference room of the Kellogg Center (820 University City Blvd). Participation is open to students (whether you are already a PPE student or interested in becoming one) and select faculty. Please sign up with Dan Gibbs (gibbsd@vt.edu) to receive your book in time to read. Enjoy free pizza and soft drinks with our discussions!