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Christopher Campo-Bowen

Professor Christopher Campo-Bowen
Christopher Campo-Bowen

Dr. Christopher Campo-Bowen is Assistant Professor of Musicology in the School of Performing Arts at Virginia Tech. He completed his Ph.D. in musicology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He holds a B.A. in Music from Stanford University and an M.M. in Orchestral Conducting from The Catholic University of America in Washington D.C.

Christopher’s research focuses on music in the Habsburg Monarchy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, especially on the relationships between music, ethnicity, gender, and empire. He is particularly interested in how conceptions of ruralness in Czech operas structured notions of subjectivity and identity. His current book project investigates how urbanites’ operatic visions of Czech rural cultures were instrumental in creating a coherent sense of ethnonational belonging, including works by Bedřich Smetana, Antonín Dvořák, and Leoš Janáček. He has published articles in the journals Nineteenth-Century Music , Cambridge Opera Journal , and The Musical Quarterly and presented at various national and international conferences, including the annual conference of the American Musicological Society, the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies annual conference, and the biannual Transnational Opera Studies Conference.

Christopher received a Fulbright grant for the Czech Republic to perform dissertation research and held a Howard Mayer Brown Fellowship from the American Musicological Society. He was a member of the UNC Royster Society of Fellows as well as the recipient of a Council for European Studies Mellon Dissertation Completion Grant. Prior to coming to Virginia Tech, he was a Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Music of the Faculty of Arts and Science at New York University. 

 Christopher Campo-Bowen Assistant Professor Squires 242-K   ccb20@vt.edu

Danille Elise Christensen

Danille Elise Christensen
Danille Elise Christensen

Dr. Danille Elise Christensen holds a PhD in Folklore from Indiana University, where she learned to pay close attention to the patterned things people say, make, and do in the course of daily life. Her work explores why the taken-for-granted matters. Broadly concerned with rhetorics of 

vernacular performance, she combines archival and ethnographic research with close analysis of texts, objects, and technologies, focusing on the ways social hierarchies are maintained and refigured through discursive and material means. Her research into football game-day celebrations, slack key guitar (kī hoʻalu), scrapbooks, and food preservation has examined the choices involved in shaping these things and events, both literally and ideologically. Her current book project--a study of how and why home canning has been promoted in the United States over the last century or so--grew out of a 2016 Kluge Fellowship at the Library of Congress and concentrates on how repeated canning enthusiasms reflect varied social and technological contexts even as they bolster fairly stable notions about who possesses legitimate, authoritative knowledge. 

In August 2015, Christensen joined Virginia Tech's Department of Religion and Culture as Assistant Professor of Public Humanities, where she works with undergraduates in American Studies and Appalachian Studies and with graduate students pursuing the Material Culture & Public Humanities degree.

Danille Elise Christensen Assistant Professor 220 Stanger Street  540-231-5528  dec09@vt.edu

Koeun Choi

Koeun Choi
Koeun Choi

Dr. Koeun Choi is an Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Science at Virginia Tech. She directs the Cognitive Developmental Science (CoDeS) lab. Her work connects cognitive development and technology to explain and support young children’s learning. Technological innovations impact our everyday lives, including young children and their families. Her research focuses on cognitive and contextual factors that influence children’s learning from technology, with the goal of supporting children’s active learning through technology. She employs multiple methods such as experiments, individual difference measures, eye-tracking, and computational and machine learning approaches to guide developmentally appropriate practices for technology integration. 

Choi’s involvement in interdisciplinary research at Virginia Tech has covered a diverse set of topics on children and emerging technologies, including eye-tracking experiments that examine the impact of mobile media on visual attention, the collection of behavioral and neuroimaging data to investigate how children learn with humanoid robots, and studies that explore the link between family stress and early screen time. 

 

Koeun Choi  Assistant Professor  295 West Campus Drive     540-231-5720 koeun@vt.edu

Alexander Dickow

 Alexander Dickow
Alexander Dickow

Alexander Dickow is the author of Caramboles (Paris: Argol Editions, 2008), a collection of poems in French and English, and Le Poète innombrable: Blaise Cendrars, Guillaume Apollinaire, Max Jacob (Paris: Hermann, 2015), a scholarly work. He lived in France as a Fulbright scholar in 2003-2004, and subsequently completed his cotutelle dissertation on French modernism in 2011 (Rutgers/Paris 8). He has published scholarship, poetry and translations in many journals abroad and in the US, and teaches the language, literature and culture of France and Francophone countries at Virginia Tech. 

Recent work includes a collection of poems, Appetites (MadHat Press, 2018) and Gustave Roud's Air of Solitude followed by Requiem co-translated with Sean T. Reynolds. Forthcoming publications include a series of intertwined novellas, Le Premier Souper (La Volte); aphorisms on art and poetry, Déblais (Louise Bottu); and a translation of Max Jacob's Central Laboratory (Wakefield Press).

Alexander Dickow Associate Professor 125 Major Williams Hall
540-231-5362 ard@vt.edu

Gregory Galford

Gregory Galford
Gregory Galford

Dr. Gregory Galford is a registered architect and an Assistant Professor of Residential Environments and Design. His research investigations involve the environmental and behavioral connections that exist within our homes. He is particularly interested in housing models that lie outside traditional norms of study. He has published works on sustainability, historical re-use, surveillance, and control. His doctoral work focused on the architectural attributes of solitary confinement environments to determine themes of dwelling and working for all stakeholders. His background in teaching covers a balance between design, theory, and construction within the built world.

Gregory Galford Associate Professor  245 Wallace Hall 540-231-9259
ggalford@vt.edu

Edward J.K. Gitre

Edward J.K. Gitre
Edward J.K. Gitre

Dr. Edward J.K. Gitre is Assistant Professor of History at Virginia Tech, as well as affiliated faculty  egitre@vt.edu with ASPECT, Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought, and Center for Human-Computer Interaction. His scholarly interests and publications focus on the history of the social sciences, war and society, interdisciplinarity, popular religious movements, and twentieth-century American culture. He has held fellowships at two interdisciplinary research centers, the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University as well as the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia, where he remains an affiliated scholar.

His current research focuses on the experiences of African Americans who served in segregated armed forces in World War II. He has two other book projects in development, the first focused on social and behavioral scientists who worked with the World War II War Department on improving troop morale. The second manuscript is devoted to David Riesman Jr., The Lonely Crowd, and the blight of mid-twentieth-century American conformity. He is also presently directing The American Soldier in World War II, a National Endowment for the Humanities-funded digital project committed to providing wide public access to a large collection of unique historical records that illuminates the military service and wartime experiences of U.S. service personnel, in their own words.

Edward J.K. Gitre   Assistant Professor  220 Stanger Street 540-231-8372 |  egitre@vt.edu

Dr. Liora O'Donnell Goldensher is a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society. Her research interests are in expertise and the professions, the afterlives of twentieth century constructivisms and feminist epistemologies, and legal heterogeneity. She teaches courses in women's and gender studies and STS with a focus on health and medicine. Her current book project examines contemporary homebirth midwifery in the United States.

 Liora O'Donnell Goldensher   Postdoctoral Associate    Department of Science, Technology, and Society lodg@vt.edu

Gil Hersch

Gil Hersch
Gil Hersch

Dr. Gil Hersch is an Assistant Professor at the Virginia Tech Department of Philosophy and the Program in PPE (Philosophy, Politics, and Economics). Hersch received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of California, San Diego in 2016. He earned a B.A. degree in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. Hersch specializes in ethical issues at the intersection of economics, business, and policy, especially as they relate to happiness and well-being.

Hersch’s research examines the relationship between philosophical theories of well-being and the variety of well-being measures available in the social sciences, and the implications this relationship can have for public policy. While agreement on what measures represent well-being as philosophers think of it might be unattainable, Hersch argues that some agreement can be reached when treating well-being measurement as a practical problem for guiding public policy.

Gil Hersch Assistant Professor
220 Stanger Street
  hersch@vt.edu

Jim A. Kuypers

Jim A Kuypers
Jim A Kuypers

Dr. Jim A. Kuypers is a Professor in Virginia Tech’s School of Communication. His research efforts are devoted primarily to exploring and understanding how professional politicians and citizens publicly address pressing social and cultural issues as these issues are relayed through the mediating lenses of the press. He is a pioneer in the area of rhetorical framing analysis. This work has led to important discoveries concerning how original messages of political actors—professionals and citizens alike—are re-framed by the press before being transmitted to the general public. In particular, Kuypers’s methodology allows researchers to investigate how the news media act to shape public awareness, understanding, and evaluations of issues and events in a particular direction.

The framing approach Kuypers has advanced has led to important discoveries that shed light on how framing research from a social scientific point of view and framing research from a rhetorical point of view often yield dramatically different results. For instance, in his work on the War on Terror, Kuypers found that, contrary to much social scientific work on the subject, the press actively countered efforts of the administrative branch of the U.S. Government to combat Islamic Terrorism. Recent work in this area combines insights from Moral Foundations Theory with Framing Analysis. In addition to his work on framing, Kuypers is actively involved in exploring how public advocacy works in the digital age. Such work has resulted in offering courses such as Public Advocacy, Digital Advocacy Campaigns, and Professional Communication.

Jim A. Kuypers Professor 112 Shanks Hall 540-231-3154 kuypers@vt.edu

Audrey Reeves

Audrey Reeves
Audrey Reeves

Dr. Audrey Reeves is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and core faculty for the ASPECT doctoral program. Her research draws on feminist perspectives on world politics, with emphasis on conflict and peace, memory and culture, and migration. Dr. Reeves is currently working on a book manuscript in which she explores how museums and memorials intervene in security governance by orchestrating visitors' bodily movements and emotions. 

Audrey Reeves  Assistant Professor 512 Major Williams Hall 540-231-9744
audreyreeves@vt.edu

Jennifer Sano-Franchini

Jennifer Sano-Franchini
Jennifer Sano-Franchini

 Dr. Jennifer Sano-Franchini is Associate Professor of English and Director of Professional and Technical Writing. Her research and teaching interests are in the cultural politics of design, Asian American rhetoric, UX, and the rhetorical work of institutions. She has published on a range of topics including the politics of Facebook's interface design, Asian American sonic rhetorics, and emotional labor on the academic job search in journals such as ​College Composition and Communication​, ​Technical Communication​, ​Rhetoric Review​, and Enculturation​.

Sano-Franchini’s works also appeared in the edited collections ​Rhetoric and Experience Architecture​, and ​Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities​, which won the 2016 Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award. Forthcoming publications include a co-authored chapter on election technologies as a tool for cultivating civic literacies in technical communication, and a​​co-authored webtext on circulating Asian American sonic rhetorics for institutional change.

Jennifer Sano-Franchini Assistant Professor
 181 Turner Street  540-231-6918 sanojenn@vt.edu

Trevor Thomas Stewart

Trevor Thomas Stewart
Trevor Thomas Stewart

 Dr. Trevor Thomas Stewart is an Associate Professor in the School of Education and the Program Leader for English Education at Virginia Tech. He received his Ph.D. in Language & Literacy Education and a Certificate in Interdisciplinary Qualitative Studies from the University of Georgia (2010). Prior to becoming a teacher educator, Dr. Stewart worked as a high school English teacher in southwestern North Carolina. His previous academic appointment was at Appalachian State University (2010-2014) where he taught courses focused on writing, English Language Arts methods, and digital literacy.

Dr. Stewart’s scholarship is grounded in the work of Russian literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin, and his research interests include the influences of educational policy and high-stakes testing on English teachers' instructional practices, making creativity a central element of the learning process, and the intersection between language and culture. In particular, his work focuses on teaching from a dialogic stance and making classrooms generative spaces that bring content into dialogue with students’ lives.

Trevor Thomas Stewart Associate Professor  1750 Kraft Drive, Room 2009 (0302) 540-231-8335 ttstew@vt.edu

Clara Suong

Clara Suong
Clara Suong

Dr. Clara Suong is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Deputy Director of the Tech4Humanity Lab for Computational Social Science Initiatives. She studies the role of information and technology in International Relations, using computational, formal, and experimental methods.

Dr. Suong received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, San Diego and completed postdoctoral training at NYU and Duke University. Her work has received support from the U.S. National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Defense, and U.S. Agency for International Development.

Clara Suong Visiting Assistant Professor     claras@vt.edu

Bonnie Zare

 Bonnie Zare
Bonnie Zare

 Dr. Bonnie Zare is an Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on discourses of identity, feminism and activism in contemporary India and in South Asian women’s fiction. 

Zare’s articles have appeared in Women’s Studies International Forum, International Journal of Cultural Studies and the Journal of Commonwealth Literature among others. She is the founder of the Keep Girls in School Project which has been supporting low-income girls in Telangana and Andhra Pradesh since 2008. In addition, her work on US rural women prisoners with lead author Susan Dewey et al is Outlaw Women: Prison, Rural Violence, and Poverty on the New American Frontier (NYU Press, June 2019).

Bonnie Zare Associate Professor  522 McBryde Hall    540-231-8189 bonzare@vt.edu