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  • Alexander Dickow "Isidore Ducasse: A Strategy for Literary Misrecognition" Isadore Ducasse was first known as the Count of Lautreamont, pseudonymic author of the Chants de Maldoror, a work glorifying the cruelty of its protagonist, the monstrous Maldoror. But Ducasse's second work, the Poesies, seems to make an about-face, declaring triumph of goodness and the high moral principles that ought to underpin every literary endeavor. This challenges the idea that writers seek to occupy a single "position" within a field of literature: Ducasse seem to occupy two diametrically opposed positions. Is such a reconciliation possible? And how are we to make sense of Ducasse/Lautreamont's apparently undecidable gesture? Many critics have suggested this work is in fact uninterpretable, yet the writer's contradictory gesture has guaranteed a permanent, if fraught, place in France's literary canon. Dr. Alexander Dickow is the author of Caramboles, a collection of poems in French and English, and has published scholarship, poetry and translations in many journals abroad and in the United States. He teaches the language, literature and culture of France and Francophone countries at Virginia Tech. The Virginia Tech Center for Humanities presents a series of talks by faculty research associates who will discuss their work. This talk is free and open to the public and we invite anyone to attend. There will be a brief Q and A session with viewers following the presentation. Registration is required. If you are an individual with a disability and desire an accommodation, please contact the Center for Humanities at (540) 231-1981 or email humanities@vt.edu at least 10 days prior to the event. Dec 02, 2020 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Virtual
  • Trevor Stewart in conversation with Sylvester Johnson: "Developing Tools to Support Teachers: Embracing Wobble Through Reflection & Collaborative Dialogue" Dr. Trevor Stewart's research relates to supporting teacher candidates and novice teachers as they work through the challenges of entering the teaching profession. Dr. Stewart will discuss two of his recent studies to illustrate how this research draws upon dialogism and the concept of wobble to help teachers respond to the challenges they encounter in their classrooms and school contexts. This discussion will focus on efforts to respond to the tension that exists between traditional roles for teachers where their agency has, too often, been curtailed, even within their classroom, and the reality that teachers can be the best advocates for themselves and, by extension, their students. Dr. Stewart is an Associate Professor in the School of Education and the Program Leader for English Education at Virginia Tech. Central to his work is a deep interest in dialogic pedagogy, which aims to bring what happens in the classroom into dialogue with life outside the classroom. Dr. Stewart's chief goal as a researcher is making the English classroom a generative space where teachers and students can follow their hearts while they develop their minds.His research interests include the influence of educational policy and high-stakes testing on English teachers' instructional practices, making creativity a central element of the learning process, and the intersection between language and culture. There will be a brief question and answer session with viewers following the discussion. The Virginia Tech Center for Humanities presents a series of talks by faculty research associates who will discuss their work. This talk is free and open to the public and we invite anyone to attend. If you are an individual with a disability and desire an accommodation, please contact the Center for humanities at 540.231.1981 or email humanities@vt.edu at least 10 business days prior to the event. Dec 07, 2020 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Virtual