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Philip Yaure

Department of  Philosophy
Blacksburg, VA 24061
philipyaure@vt.edu

Philip Yaure is an assistant professor of philosophy at Virginia Tech. He completed his PhD in philosophy at Columbia University.

Yaure works in social and political philosophy and anti-racist critical theory. His research addresses topics including citizenship, political judgment and expertise, resistance, oppression, and the nature of political community. He engages with these topics through the history of Black political thought in the US, focusing on the antebellum period.

Yaure also has substantial research interests in early modern philosophy, especially on the role of humility in the epistemology of 17th century thinkers Margaret Cavendish and John Locke.

For more information about Dr. Yaure's work, visit his professional website: www.philipyaure.com.

  • Social and Political Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Race
  • Early Modern Philosophy
  • Feminist Philosophy
  • Ethics
  • PhD in Philosophy, Columbia University, 2020
  • MPhil in Philosophy, Columbia University, 2019
  • MA in Philosophy, Columbia University, 2017
  • BA in Philosophy and Medieval Studies, University of Chicago, 2014
  • Niles Research Grant, Virginia Tech, for Seizing Citizenship: Frederick Douglass's Abolitionist Republicanism, 2022-23
  • Juneteenth Faculty Scholar, Virginia Tech, for Seizing Citizenship: Frederick Douglass's Abolitionist Republicanism, 2021-22
  • Research Fellowship, Center for PPE, Virginia Tech, Seizing Citizenship: Frederick Douglass's Abolitionist Republicanism, 2021-22
  • Mellow Prize, Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, for “On Plantation Politics: Citizenship and Antislavery Resistance in Douglass’s My Bondage and My Freedom,” 2020

Journal Articles

  • “On Plantation Politics: Citizenship and Antislavery Resistance in Douglass’s My Bondage and My Freedom.” Philosophical Studies, forthcoming. (Special Issue on Best and Most Notable Work from APA Pacific Division 2020/2021)
  • “Declaration in Douglass’s My Bondage and My Freedom.” American Political Thought 9, no. 4 (2020): 513–41. https://doi.org/10.1086/710756.
  • “Deliberation and Emancipation: Some Critical Remarks.” Ethics 129, no. 1 (2018): 8–38. https://doi.org/10.1086/698731.

Book Reviews

  • Review of Tunde Adeleke, In the Service of God and Humanity: Conscience, Reason, and the Mind of Martin R. Delany, University of South Carolina Press, in Civil War Book Review 23, iss. 2 (2021). https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/cwbr/vol23/iss2/11/.
  • Review of Keneshia N. Grant, The Great Migration and the Democratic Party: Black Voters and the Realignment of American Politics in the 20th Century, in New Political Science 43, no. 3 (2021): 372-374. https://doi.org/10.1080/07393148.2021.1957315

 

 

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