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Course List (NCR Campus)

STS 6234: History of Earth and Climate Science: The Challenges of Time (Advanced Topics in the History of Modern Science, Technology, and Medicine) (elective)

Instructor: John Cloud                                      
Tuesdays 7:00–9:45pm, ONLINE (via Zoom videoconference)

As climate change and especially global warming are considered the most critical problems of our age, it is interesting that the first formulation of the mechanism for this was written in 1896 by the Swedish physicist/chemist Svante Arrhenius. The mechanisms and the key equation emerged fully formed and still hold up today. Using the Stefan–Boltzmann law, Arrhenius formulated what he referred to as a 'rule': “If the quantity of carbonic acid [CO2] increases in geometric progression, the augmentation of the temperature will increase nearly in arithmetic progression.”
The objective of this class is to explore the pre-histories into histories of what we now call the natural or earth sciences, considered broadly to include humans and anthropology. The evolution of theories of climate change will be one focus, along with topics such as plate tectonics, biogeography and evolution, and the early information technologies that supported discipline-building and dissemination. Both “climate” and “change” are embedded in time. Scientific progress for some centuries now has been grounded in greatly expanded perceptions of the age of the earth and cosmos, and the lengths of the evolutions of life and culture, compared to earlier chronologies in all cultures.  Accordingly, the core text for the class will be Andrew Shryrock and Daniel Lord Smail’s Deep History: The Architecture of Past and Present. Students will prepare research projects that will be presented and critiqued in the last two class sections.

Required book:

Shryock, Andrew et al. 2011. Deep History: The Architecture of Past and Present. Berkeley, CA, University of California Press. ISBN: 9780520274624

STS 6664: Science and Technology in Development (Advanced Topics in Science and Technology Policy) (elective)
Instructor: Raquel Machaqueiro
Thursdays 7:00–9:45pm, ONLINE (via Zoom videoconference)

Aid and development initiatives have been at the center of Western interventions in the Global South since the end of colonialism. Taking various forms—from HIV treatment to environmental conservation, from democratization to enforcement of Human Rights—these types of interventions have tremendous impacts in the lives of people from the so-called developing countries, while also significantly shaping transnational governance and policy-making. Differing in their scale and scope, development interventions share however, common features—such as the goal to improve the lives of those targeted—and common assumptions, many of which related to the presumed lack of knowledge, scientific experience, and access to technology by those deemed in need of development. This seminar will introduce students to some of the debates in Development, while paying a very close look to the role of science and technology in development initiatives. Through several ethnographic examples covering different areas of intervention in the Global South, the course will examine topics such as: science and technology’s inherent ties to unequal relations of power established during colonialism, and perpetuated through links of economic dependency; the role of science in defining development problems, and establishing the technical solutions to it; how local knowledges and experiences are often sidelined in development interventions; the deployment of scientific discourses in the depoliticization of development interventions, and in the reduction of governance to mere technocratic procedures; local interpretations and practices of development, modernity, and science and technology.

At the end of this course, students should be able to understand the role of science and technology in shaping development interventions, as well as critically discuss the effects (intended and unintended) of development on processes of global importance (such as health, democratization, political governance, and conflict).

Books to purchase:

1.       Benton, Adia. 2015. HIV Exceptionalism: Development through Disease in Sierra Leone. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

2.       Coles, Kimberley. 2007. Democratic Designs: International Intervention and Electoral Practices in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

3.       Günel, Gökçe. 2019. Spaceship in the Desert: Energy, Climate Change, and Urban Design in Abu Dhabi. Durham: Duke University Press.

4.       Preston, Christopher. 2019. The Synthetic Age: Outdesigning, Evolution, Resurrecting Species and Reengineering Our World. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

5.       Richards, Paul. 2016. Ebola: How a People’s Science Helped End an Epidemic. London: Zed Books.

6.       Tilley, Helen. 2011. Africa as a Living Laboratory: Empire, Development, and the Problem of Scientific Knowledge, 1870-1950. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

 

STS 5106: Contemporary Issues in S&T (core course)

Dr. Barbara Allen, Tuesdays 7:00-9:45

This course is the second of two core courses that introduce students to the social studies of science and technology. While the first course focuses on the emergence and development of the social studies of science as a field, this course examines more contemporary theories and approaches to science and technology. Over the last few decades, scholars in Science and Technology Studies (STS) have developed new theoretical and methodological approaches to analyzing not only the transformative impacts of technoscience on society, but also how social arrangements fundamentally influence their development in the first place. Readings will include foundational texts relevant to contemporary issues in STS as well as more recent scholarship and topics. Students will come to understand from a variety of viewpoints how societies and technosciences interact. Prerequisites: STS 5105 or Intro to STS is strongly recommended.

STS 5305: Main Themes in the Philosophy of Modern Science and Technology (core class)

Dr. Jim Collier (via zoom), Mondays 7:00-9:45 

What is the purpose of philosophy? What, specifically, is the purpose and place of the philosophy of science in Science and Technology Studies (STS)? Given the general shift in interest in STS to technology, technoscience, and micro- sociological and anthropological methods and research, how might being philosophically-minded cash out in scholarly practice? Our class will take up these metaphilosophical questions in examining how the philosophy of science and technology speaks to issues in STS. Initially using an historical approach, we will map the respective approaches in continental and analytic philosophy, examine the social turn in the philosophy of science through the 20th to the early 21st century, and perform a close comparative reading of five signature articles from the philosophy of science and the philosophy of technology. Our learning goal is to develop a refined philosophical perspective for work in STS.

STS 6564: Risk in Contemporary Culture

Dr. Sonja Schmid, Thursdays 7:00-9:45
This seminar provides an introduction to the phenomenon of risk from a sociological, historical, and cultural perspective. We will ask questions such as: What constitutes a risk and for whom? Who gets to decide what risks are worth taking? What constitutes credible information and what role do experts play? We will explore how ideas of safety, reliability, and probability shape our understanding of risk, and address the assumptions underlying and influencing the practices of risk assessment and regulation. We will focus on the role of communication, trust, and legitimacy in risk management and regulation, and how to facilitate stable, consensual decisions in contemporary societies.

Theoretical and practical aspects of the public's role in the development, application, and oversight of scientific and technological advances.

Intellectual and institutional history of the field. Key theories, methods, and domains of study. Relation among perspectives from contributing disciplines, and emerging interdisciplinary trends. Emphasis on both solid grounding through classic texts, and discussion of emergent research areas.

Theoretical and methodological issues addressed in the interdisciplinary social study of contemporary science and technology. 5105: social studies of science; 5106: social studies of technology. I

Theoretical and methodological issues addressed in the interdisciplinary social study of contemporary science and technology. 5105: social studies of science; 5106: social studies of technology. II

Methods and concepts in the history of science and technology. 5205: research methods, interpretive approaches, and contemporary issues in the history of science; 5206: research methods, interpretive approaches, and contemporary issues in the history of technology. I

Methods and concepts in the history of science and technology. 5205: research methods, interpretive approaches, and contemporary issues in the history of science; 5206: research methods, interpretive approaches, and contemporary issues in the history of technology. II

Technical essentials, policy analysis, theoretical perspectives of nuclear energy and nuclear nonprofileration. Fundamentals of the nuclear fuel cycle, management of international safeguards, threat of nuclear terrorism, and challenges for global nuclear industry. Pre: Graduate standing.

Problems, literature, and schools in the philosophy of science and technology. 5305: explanation and confirmation; 5306: theory change. I

Problems, literature, and schools in the philosophy of science and technology. 5305: explanation and confirmation; 5306: theory change. II

Examines policy developments and practices that move beyond the conceptual divisions and policy operations begun during the 1970s, which largely divided the more natural science- based environmental sciences from social science-based environmental based studies. Mixes the insights of life science, physical science, social science, applied humanities, and public policy into a cohesive conceptual and operational approach to environmental protection in the 21st century. Graduate standing.

Variable topics in science and technology studies such as role of values in science and technology, risk assessment, and past and present relations of religion to science and technology. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. I

Identification and analysis of ethical issues arising in basic and applied biological, medical, environmental, ecological, and energy studies.

Examines research designs and practices that uncover historical relationships between knowledge contents and social dimensions of science, technology, and medicine. Includes archival research, archaeology of instruments and physical spaces, interviewing for knowledge content, logical and conceptual analysis, participant observation, questionnaires, and proposal preparation.

Strategies for science and technology policy; science education; scientific and technical information for societal uses; government and public policy; resource allocation; economy and global exchanges of science and technology; approaches to policy evaluation.

Variable topics in history of science, technology, and medicine after 1800, such as the atomic age; space science; science, technology, and institutions; scientific and technological medicine; and environmental history. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits.

Explores a variety of social factors, past and present, that have affected the way we make, use, and think about computers and the Internet. Begins with the origins of the Internet and the people who shape this technology, from military strategists to hackers. Examines the ways diverse groups interact and build communities online and how cultural norms about race and gender shape the ways we participate in the world of computing. Graduate standing required.

Philosophers of science from 1650 to 1900 with particular attention to the historical development of views about the methods of induction and hypothesis and accounts of theory testing.

Variable topics in advanced philosophy of science, including major theories of scientific explanation and their criticisms; philosophical foundations of statistics; naturalized philosophy of science. May be repeated for credit, with permission and different content, for a maximum of 12 hours.

Variable topics in cultural studies of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and health. May include theories of language and science, popular and public knowledges, cultural performances around science and technology, conceptions of health and the body, cultures of quantification, technology and identity, hierarchies and diversity in science and technology, and cross-cultural comparisons. May be repeated with different content up to a maximum of 12 credits.

Social-scientific perspectives in energy policy. National and international topics and controversies such as fossil fuel resources, climate change, energy security, and the debate over nuclear power. Comparison of international perspectives. Challenges involved with management and regulation of large technological systems, the politics of expertise at the intersection of global climate change and energy security, and the changing character of our global energy infrstructure. Pre: Graduate standing.

Conceptual perspectives on social and cultural studies of risk. Qualitative theories and tools for analyzing a wide range of risks in contemporary culture. Definitions of risk as opposed to concepts such as danger, hazard, and uncertainty. Perception of risk and selective bias in risk perception. Efficiency, objectivity, and morality as factors influencing risk assessment and risk management, and affective definitions of safety and reliability. Role of expertise, trust, and communication in risk regulation. Democratic policy instruments to facilitate stable, legitimate decisions about what risks to take or avoid in contemporary societies. Pre: Graduate Standing.

Variable topics in technology studies, including development and structure of knowledge in technology and engineering, social construction of technology, knowledge and power in technology, gender and technology, engineering in society, human/nonhuman relations in technology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits. I,II

Variable topics in science and technology policy. Includes advanced study of science, technology, and economy; science, technology, and power; strategies for research and development policy --public and private sector; transfer of technology; technological forecasting; government regulation and responses; science policy assumptions and challenges, specialist knowledge and expertise; state and academic knowledge production; issues of race, class, gender, and national identity in policy work. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits.

Variable topics in alternate perspectives. Includes science from scientists' perspectives, indigenous knowledge forms, alternative medicine, New Age science, cyborg theorizing, heterodox perspectives. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits.

Variable topics in social studies of science, technology, and medicine, including studies of disciplines, institutions, boundaries, discourses, knowledges, and practices. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits.