Virginia Tech®home

About the Learning Sciences Graduate Certificate

a multi racial group of young adult women chat at a table in a college environment

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Graduate Certificate in the Learning Sciences provides an advanced understanding of learning in formal and  informal environments, integrating perspectives from instructional design and technology, educational  psychology, and social foundations of education.

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate in the  Learning Sciences will have demonstrated requisite knowledge and skills necessary to conceptualize, design, deliver, and measure effective learning.

The Graduate Certificate in the Learning Sciences is  appropriate for advanced graduate students considering careers such as higher education faculty, research  scientists, educational administrators, funding agency program directors, and policy makers. 

To complete the Graduate Certificate in the Learning Sciences, students must be enrolled currently and in  good standing in any graduate program at Virginia Tech. Students considering the Certificate should consult with faculty in one of the associated programs to plan their study to be consistent with prior experience, career goals, and certificate requirements

we look down on a woman sitting before a computer taking notes. she is right handed

WHAT YOU'LL STUDY

Students must take at least twelve credit hours in the options listed below. All students are required to  enroll in EDIT 5234, Introduction to the Learning Sciences. Students will then choose one elective, equal to a three-credit-hour course, from three of the other four categories listed below, Cognition, Design,  Social Foundations, and Technology. 

The order of these courses, including EDIT 5234, may be taken at the discretion of the student after consulting with his or her advisor. Students must complete the courses with a grade of B or better to receive the certificate.

Introductory Course (Required for Certificate)

  • EDIT 5234: Introduction to the Learning Sciences

Courses in Cognition

  • EDEP 5114: Learning and Cognition
  • EDEP 6114: Cognitive Processes and Educational Practice
  • EDEP 6224: Constructivism and Education
  • EDEP 6444: Motivation and Cognition

Courses in Design

  • EDIT 5164: Design for Learning *
  • EDIT 6334: Applied Theories of Learning *
  • EDIT 5224: Principles for Learning Message Design

* Note: Prior permission of instructor required for non-degree students outside Instructional Design and  Technology or Educational Psychology

Courses in Social Foundations

  • EDEP 5184: Sociocultural Influences on Learning and Instruction
  • EDCI 6024: The Analysis of Educational Concepts

Courses in Technology

  • EDIT 5614: Digitally Mediated Learning
  • EDIT 5634: Interactive Learning Media Development

EDIT Course Descriptions

Course addresses the systematic design of learning experiences and environments. Emphasizes the use of instructional design (ID) models and predominant learning theories (behaviorist, cognitive, and constructivist) to create effective learning experiences. Explores models, principles, and processes used to support learning in both formal (e.g., education, industry) and informal learning environments. Students will design learning experiences employing the models, principles, and processes.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

A problem-based course applying the principles of message design in the development and production of learning materials. Involves the manipulation of appropriate design elements to influence understanding and behavior. Principles applied primarily through the use of the computer, but applicable to all media. Pre: Graduate standing.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Foundational approaches to the new science of learning, from a broad range of perspectives. Interdisciplinary science of learning; current theories of learning; research design and analysis methods resources, and designs for new learning environments. Pre: Graduate standing.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Critical examination of the design, adoption, and use of a digital media (digital games, simulations, social networking technologies) for primarily P-20 education. Applications to formal and informal learning environments.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Design processes is for developing interactive learning media incorporating arts, sciences, and education. Design phases including ideation, storyboarding, public presentation and critique. Design principles and output scenarios for prototyping interactive media to support teaching and learning. Pre: Graduate standing.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Application of learning and instructional theories to the practice of designing learning environments and particularly the development of technology-based learning materials.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

EDEP Course Descriptions

Psychological theories and models which serve as a basis for educational models and practice. Emphasis on conceptions of learning and cognitive process. Pre: Graduate standing.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Theories and empirical research on the influence of language, semiotics, dialogue, manipulatives, and social groups on cognition. Practical application through observation of classrooms and visits to science museums. Pre: Graduate standing.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Investigates complex human learning from the perspective of cognitive/information processing theories. Emphasizes methods of investigation in cognitive science as well as strategies for using a cognitive orientation in educational settings.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Philosophical, theoretical, and empirical foundations of the broad field of constructivism, including the limits of epistemology and ontology, the determination of truth and reality, and applications to education and everyday life. Emphasis on radical constructivism, social constructivism, symbolic interactionism, social constructionism, and cognitive constructivism, and their applications to education.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

Explores current research in the field of motivation as it relates to educational settings. Students will learn how motivation constructs relate to student behavior and cognition, how to select appropriate strategies to motivate students, and how to design measures to assess student motivation.

Credit Hour(s): 3

Lecture Hour(s): 3

Level: Graduate

CERTIFICATE FACULTY

Katherine Cennamo smiles warmly for the camera
Katherine S. Cennamo, Professor, Certificate Program Leader
David Alexander leans causally on a balustrade
Peter Doolittle, Professor
Glen Holmes smiles warmly for the camera.
Glen Holmes, Collegiate Professor
Dr. Price smiles for the camera, relaxed and happy, wearing a blue plaid shirt which is open over a t shirt. He is poised and confident
Brett Jones, Professor
Dr. Price smiles for the camera, relaxed and happy, wearing a blue plaid shirt which is open over a t shirt. He is poised and confident
Ken Potter, Clinical Assistant Professor
Dr. Weaver-Hightower smiles happily at the camera. He stands in front of a wall of Hokie Stone, wearing a white shirt with narrow grey stripes, and a grey tie with blue and tan dots
Marcus Weaver-Hightower, Professor