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Casey M. McGregor

Casey M. McGregor, M.S.-Ph.D Student in Child and Adolescent Development

Name, Title
Casey M. McGregor, M.S.-Ph.D Student in Child and Adolescent Development

Department of Human Development and Family Science
Blacksburg, VA 24061

caseymc@vt.edu

Casey McGregor is a Ph.D. candidate in Human Development at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on parenting processes and child outcomes within contexts of cumulative risk. Casey approaches research from a resilience lens and is adapt at multiple research methods, including qualitative, quantiative, and mixed methods. Through her dissertation work, Casey is examining how intensive mothering beliefs connect with children’s cognitive development and social-emotional adjustment. Additionally, Casey is examining to what extent intensive mothering beliefs may promote adaptive parenting within the context of risk. 

Casey received her B.S. in Human Development and Family Studies from Penn State Altoona and her M.S. in Human Development from Virginia Tech. Her thesis work focused on the lived experience of young mothers as it pertained to intergenerational family support in rural Appalachia. She is projected to finish her Ph.D. in Human Development in May 2022. 

  • Parenting 
  • Early Childhood Development
  • Intensive Mothering
  • Maternal, Paternal, and Child Wellbeing 
  • Multiple Research Methods 
  • MS in Human Development, Virginia Tech, 2018
  • BS in Human Development and Family Studies, Penn State Altoona, 2016 

McGregor, C.M. & Arditti, J.A. (in progress). Young mothers in Appalachia: Developmental paradox and meanings of help from family.

Arditti, J. A., McGregor, C., Dennison, S., Johnson, S., & Besemer, K. (2021). Maternal mediation in the context of fathers' incarceration and reentry. Family Relations, 70, 146-161. https://doi.org/10.1111/fare.12526

Johnson, E. I., Arditti, J. A., McGregor, C.M. (2018). Risk, protection, and adjustment among youth with incarcerated and non-resident parents: A mixed-methods study. Journal of Child and Family Studies. doi: 10.1007/s10826-018-1045-0