Bradley J. Nichols

Bradley J. Nichols

Visiting Assistant Professor

Office

432 Major Williams Hall 
220 Stanger Street 
Blacksburg, VA 24060

Phone

540-231-1722

Email

bradleyn@vt.edu

Department Membership

History

Expertise

  • Modern Germany
  • War and Society
  • Genocide
  • Race and Empire
  • World War II

Professional Activities

  • German Studies Association
  • Society for Military History
  • American Historical Association
  • Association for the Study of Nationalities

Education

  • Ph.D. University of Tennessee
  • M.A. West Chester University
  • B.A. Ohio University

Research Interests

    Selected Publications

    Book Chapters

    “Nazi Germanization Policy in Occupied Europe: An Overview.” In German-Occupied Europe in the Second World War, edited by Raffael Scheck, Julia Torrie, and Fabien Theofilakis. London: Routledge, forthcoming.

    “Forging the Aryan Utopia: Nazi Racial Policy in Occupied Poland, 1939-1945.” In The Routledge History of the Holocaust, edited by Jonathan L. Friedman. London: Routledge, 2011.

    Articles

    “Housemaids, Renegades, and Race Experts: The Nazi Re-Germanization Procedure for Polish Domestic Servant Girls.” German History 33, no. 2 (June 2015): 214-231.

    Sponsored Research

    Thomas Fellowship, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Tennessee, 2015-2016

    Cummings Foundation Fellowship, Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2014

    Research Fellowship, Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies, German Studies Association/Freie Universität Berlin, 2011-2012

    Additional Information

    Dr. Nichols is currently working on a book manuscript, entitled “The Hunt for Lost Blood: Nazi Germanization Policy in Occupied Europe,” which explores how the wartime Third Reich sought to assimilate and naturalize millions of foreign subjects on the basis of racial kinship. He is also conducting preliminary research for a second monograph that will focus on the mass murder of Soviet POWs in German captivity during the Second World War.