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ENGL 1004
Introduction to English Studies

First-Year Experience course that prepares students for study and inquiry at a research institution. Introduction to English studies and its various fields-Creative Writing, Professional Writing, and Literature & Language.

  • 2 Credit Hours
ENGL 1105, 1106
First-Year Writing

1105: Introduction to rhetorical analysis, visual rhetoric, critical writing, and critical thinking; intensive reading of works in multiple genres; practice in writing and revision; fundamentals of oral presentations. 1106: Continued study in rhetorical analysis and the conventions of various genres; intensive instruction in writing and revision of work that incorporates research; experience in oral presentations.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1204H
Honors Freshman English

Introduction to analytical, critical, and interpretive writing and reading at an advanced level and accelerated pace for students whose test scores and high school work indicate readiness for the Honors level of complexity, responsibility, and initiative; in a single semester, reviews the work of 1105 and focuses on the work of 1106 at the Honors level. Placement by the English Department required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
  • Honors Option Available
ENGL 1504
Introduction to Contemporary Linguistics

Introduction to the sounds of language, processes by which words and sentences are formed, how the meanings of words are established by context, and why languages vary and change over time. (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1514
Language and Society

English language variation considered from social, regional, ethnic, gender, and style perspectives.  Emphasis on vernacular varieties of American English.  Attention paid to the social evaluation of different language varieties.  (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL/PSYC 1524
Language and the Mind

Examination of what is unique about human language and the evidence that language affects thought.  Investigation of how listeners categorize sounds, parse sentences, and access meaning.  Examination of what brain damage and speech errors reveal about language in the brain and mind. (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1604
Introduction to Poetry

This course examines the genre of poetry from the Old English period up to contemporary writers. Emphasis is on close reading and poetic forms and conventions.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1614
Introduction to Short Fiction

This course introduces the knowledge and skills required to read and understand short stories and novellas. Readings trace the development of short fiction from the fable and myth to contemporary narrative forms.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1624
Introduction to Detective Fiction

This course introduces students to classic and modern texts of detective fiction from a variety of historical periods and cultural traditions.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1634
Introduction to Shakespeare

This course introduces Shakespeare's drama and poetry, including at least one modern adaptation of a Shakespearean play (play, novel, movie, opera, etc.). Emphasis is placed on how to read a play, how to read Shakespearean verse, and how the various genres of Shakespearean drama differ.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1644
Introduction to World Literature

This course examines masterpieces of world literature in translation. Readings focus upon one or two common themes across places and times.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1654
Introduction to Science Fiction and Fantasy

This course introduces a variety of speculative works within the genres of science fiction and fantasy. Attention will be given to the development and principal characteristics of each genre. Emphasis is placed on the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which specific speculative texts have been produced.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1664
Introduction to Women's Literature

This introductory course examines literary and cultural questions raised by women writers throughout history and from different cultural backgrounds. Emphasis is on women's writing in English, but the course may include some literature in translation.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 1674
Introduction to African American Literature

This course introduces students to some of the major writers of the African American literary tradition from such early poets as Phillis Wheatley to such contemporary novelists as Toni Morrison. The course situates the literary works within their historical and cultural contexts, but also emphasizes close readings of the texts.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2444/HUM 2444/CLA 244
Ancient Greek and Roman Mythology

Survey of Ancient Greek and Roman mythology and modern interpretations. In English. No knowledge of Ancient Greek or Latin required. Not for credit toward a Latin Minor.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2515, 2616
Survey of British Literature I and II

A two-course sequence introducing students to the major writers of the British literary tradition; 2515 extends from the medieval period to the death of Alexander Pope in 1744; 2516 continues to the present day. This course provides the literary, historical, and social contexts necessary to comprehend significant developments in poetry, drama, prose fiction, and criticism. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2525/2526
Survey of American Literature I or II

A two-semester sequence introducing students to the major writers of the American literary tradition; 2525 extends from the colonial period to the end of the nineteenth century; 2526 continues to the present day. This course provides the literary, historical, and social contexts necessary to comprehend significant developments in poetry, drama, prose fiction, and criticism. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2534
American Literary History

Introduction to American literary traditions, from the Colonial period through Modernism. Emphases on historical, social, and cultural contexts as these are reflected by representative texts.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2544
British Literary History

Introduction to British literary traditions, from the Anglo-Saxon period through Modernism. Emphasis on historical, social, and cultural contexts as these are reflected by representative texts.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2604
Introduction to Critical Reading

An introduction to the techniques and theoretical implications of close reading, focusing on the literary criticism of a work from each of the following genres: poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction. Students learn the analytical skills, basic critical terminology, and conventions of literary criticism essential to advanced English studies. Intended for English majors. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2614
The English Studies ePortfolio

A lecture/lab course in which students are introduced to the concept of the required English Studies ePortfolio, receive coaching in developing it's various components, and develop the software and technology skills necessary to create an entry-level ePortfolio that they will continue to work on during the course of their undergraduate study. In addition to creating the ePortfolio, students learn about the discipline of English Studies and its various areas of specialization. Co: ENGL 2604.

  • 2 Credit Hours
ENGL 2624
Reading and Writing Across English Studies

A variable topics, foundational course in the study and practice of reading and writing employed across disciplinary areas in English Studies.  Introduction to rhetorical, creative, and professional modes.  Writing intensive.  Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 2016.  (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2804/AINS 2804
Contemporary Native American Literatures

This course offers a sampling of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction by the most influential American Indian writers since 1970, authors such as Momaday, Silko, Deloria, Welch, Harjo, and Alexie. Students will also learn about thoseaspects of cosmology and storytelling traditionally shared by all American Indian Nations, as well as about those aspects specific to the individual tribal traditions from which the authors and their characters come. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 2964
Field Study

Pass/Fail only.

  • Variable Credit Hours
ENGL 2974
Independent Study
  • Variable Credit Hours
  • Honors Option Available
ENGL 2984
Special Study
  • Variable Credit Hours
ENGL 3024/RLCL 3024
Religion and Literature

Analysis of literary works and critical debates in such areas as: pilgrimage, myth, disaster, and transcendence. Students will make presentations, develop their own research projects, and design sessions with short reading assignments later in the semester. As a final project, students will assemble a portfolio charting their work in the course.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL/WGS 3134
Gender and Linguistics

Exploration of differences — real and imagined — in the speech of men and women.  Examination of how language can reflect and reinforce gender inequality.  Linguistic phenomena covered: pitch, vocabulary, sound change, language ideologies, and discourse strategies and types.  Pre:  ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.  (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL/RLCL/SOC 3144
Language and Ethnicity in the United States

Exploration of how racial and ethnic identity are expressed through the use of different languages and dialects.  Examination of how language is related to issues of equality, social opportunity, and discrimination in the United States. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016. (3H, 3C)

 

ENGL 3154
Literature, Medicine, and Culture

The representation of health and illness in literature and the cultural aspects of medicine as a practice. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3204
Medieval Literature

This course presents medieval British literature from ca. 700 to 1500 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the literary influences of pagan antiquity, the native British (Celtic) tradition, Scandinavian and contemporary continental influences, the Crusades, the Byzantine Empire, and the philosophical traditions of neoplatonism and scholasticism. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3214
Renaissance Literature

This course presents Renaissance British literature from 1500-1660 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the discovery of the Copernican universe and the new world, the rise of Protestantism, the resultant Counter-reformation, the movement from humanism to empiricism, and the institution of Parliamentary democracy. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3224
Literature of the Enlightenment

Focus on Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature from 1660 to 1800, the period generally recognized as the Enlightenment. Examination of the new resiliance on reason and scientific method rather than superstition and tradition through the study of such writers as Bunyan, Swift, Dryden, and Johnson. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3234
Romantic Literature

This course presents Romantic literature from the late eighteenth century to 1832 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the French, American, and Industrial Revolutions, the expansion of the British empire, the rise of the novel, Gothicism, and the intellectual influence of periodical essays. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, fictional prose, and non-fictional prose. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3244
Victorian Literature

This course presents Victorian British Literature from 1832 to 1901 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including the development of modern science and the decline of traditional religion, the emergence of the mass reading public, and the glorification of the writer's role as prophet, guide, and culture critic. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poems, essays, plays, and novels. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3254
American Literature Before 1900

This course presents American literature from before 1900 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including colonization, the founding of the republic, the Civil War, the settlement of the west, American Romanticism, and American Realism. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry and fictional and non-fictional prose. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3264
Modernist British Literature

This course presents Modernist British literature from 1918-1945 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including World Wars I and II, the collapse of the British empire, the influence of Darwin, Marx, and Freud, and such literary movements as Modernism, Realism, and Stream of Consciousness. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3274
Modernist American Literature

This course presents Modernist American literature from 1918 to 1945 in its representative modes and defining contexts, including World Wars I and II, the Great Depression, and such literary movements as Modernism and Realism. Specific authors and texts will vary, but will include poetry, prose, and drama. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3304/AINS 3304
The Languages of Native America

Study of the structures of the native languages of the Americas; their interrelationships; their use in individual speech communities; contact with other languages; the interrelationships of linguistic structure, culture, and thought; their future survival. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3314
Working English Grammar

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of standard English written grammar. Some attention will also be paid to the use of English grammar for varying purposes.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3324
Acts of Interpretation

Foundational interpretive approaches in literary and rhetorical studies. Emphasis on broad frameworks and their implications for textual analysis. Pre: ENGL 2624.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3364
Topics in Literature by Women

This rotating topics course examines literature written by women with different national and ethnic identities and from different historical periods. Specific content varies, but the common focus is on the fundamental issues surrounding women's writing, the critical methodologies commonly employed to analyze this writing, and the historical, social, and literary contexts influencing the particular writing being studied. May be repeated once with different content. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3414/GER 3414
German Literature in English

A variable content course devoted to the study of major German literary works in English translation. May be repeated with different content. May not be taken for credit toward a major or minor in a foreign language. No knowledge of German required. In English. One 2000-level English literature course required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3424/RUS 3424
Russian Literature in English

Variable-content course devoted to the study of Russian literary classics. Readings and lectures in English. Topics will range from general surveys of 19th century or 20th century Russian literature to more intensive study of the works of a single major author like Tolstoy or Dostoevsky. May be repeated with different content. No knowledge of Russian required. In English. One 2000-level English literature course required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3434/SPAN 3434
Hispanic Literature in English

Variable content course devoted to the study of major works of Spanish and Spanish-American literature in translation. May be repeated with different content. May not be taken for credit toward a major or minor in Spanish. No knowledge of Spanish required. In English. One 2000-level English literature course required. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3514
Ethnic Literature for Children

This course examines the historical contexts of and issues surrounding ethnic literature for children. The course considers the literature in terms of aesthetics, cultural representations, and identity. Ethnic literatures considered may include Native American, African American, Asian American, and Latino/a. The course also introduces other ethnic literary traditions, such as world folk tales, that influence or parallel American ethnic children's books. Pre: ENGL 1204H or ENGL 1106 or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3524
Literature for Children

General critical and historical survey of traditional and contemporary writing for children: picture books, folk literature, modern fantasy, poetry, drama, modern fiction, historical fiction.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3534
Literature and Ecology

Study of the poetry, prose and dramatic literature that stresses human cooperation with nature conceived as a dynamic, interrelated series of cyclic feedback systems. Included are ways aesthetic values (literary themes, form, vision, perception, language) intersect with selected ecological concepts such as biocentrism, the food chain, energy transfer, Gaia theory, and ecofeminism; selected works by contemporary ecologists and environmentalists, and a study of the origins of ecology in the Greek oikos or home. This is a writing intensive course. Pre: ENGL 1106.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3544/CINE 3544/COMM 3544
Literature and Cinema

Works of literature and the films into which they have been transformed; emphasis on differences between media.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3584
The Bible as Literature

This course focuses on the Bible both as a work of literature and as a major influence on the literatures of the world. Specific books of the Bible to be covered as well as literary-critical approaches will vary. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3614
Southern Literature

The literature of the American South from 1840 to the present with emphasis on 20th-century fiction, drama, and poetry. Concentration on such writers as Faulkner, Capote, Chopin, Langston Hughes, O'Connor, Welty, Alice Walker, and others. Exploration of such themes as importance of land, family, community; roles of industry and agrarianism; race relations.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3624
Appalachian Literature

Appalachian writers from the 1800s to the present, including Murfree, Wolfe, and selected contemporary authors. Course will treat artistic merit and such selected themes as the mountains, Appalachia as a frontier, ambivalence about the Civil War, religion, folk ways and traditions, coal mining, and cottage industries. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3634/AFST 3634
African-American Literature

Afro-American writings from Phyllis Wheatley through the slave narratives of the nineteenth century to such modern figures as Wright, Hughes, Baldwin, and Morrison. Pre: ENGL 1106.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3644
The Postcolonial Novel

Correlates theoretical, literary, and historical materials from both "western" and "indigenous" sources in order to study at least two postcolonial settings (e.g. Indian, African, South American, Caribbean). Issues will include both contextual matters and literary problems. Pre: ENGL 1106.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3654
Ethnic American Literature

Variable content course which introduces major American ethnic literatures: African-American, Asian-American, Chicano/a, Arab-American, and Native American. Representative texts from one or two of these categories are examined within the cultural, historical, and geographical matrices within which they are written. May be repeated twice for credit if the content is different. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3684
Literature and the Law

This course introduces students to the representation of the law and lawyers in literature. Emphasis is placed on the cultural and historical contexts that shape our perception of the law and legal practice and on the use of facts, research, interpretation, and rhetoric in legal argument. Junior standing required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3694
Topics in World Novels

Rotating-topics course in world novels, either translated into, or originally written in, English. Emphasis on critical reading of novels written from different cultural contexts. May be repeated once with different topics. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3754
Advanced Composition

Advanced training in writing analytical and critical essays. Practice in addressing a range of audiences and in using varied styles and organizational patterns. Workshop and conference for students in arts and humanities, as well as for technical and extension students who wish to address non-specialized audiences and to practice forms outside their own fields. Junior standing required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3844
Writing and Digital Media

Introduction of the fundamental practices and emerging theories of writing with, and for, digital media. Basic authoring in web development syntaxes, critical interpretation of online sources, social media management, and topics of computational abstraction for writers. Pre: ENGL 1106, ENGL 1204H, or COMM 1016 (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 3954
Study Abroad

X-grade allowed.

  • Variable Credit Hours
ENGL 3984
Special Study
  • Variable Credit Hours
ENGL 4004
Linguistic Discourse Analysis

Introduction to discourse analysis. This course examine spoken and written discourses of English. Further attention will be paid to how discourse functions in political, legal, medical, and educational contexts.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4034
The Sounds of Language

Examination of the acoustic attributes of vowels and consonants (phonemes), voice qualities, and voice emotions.  Establishment of connections between acoustics and articulation.  Measurement of interspeaker differences.  Study of the linguistic and social reasons for variation within speakers.  Basic introduction to digital signal processing tools and auditory phonetics. Prerequisite:  ENGL 1504 or ISE 3614. (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4044
Language and Society

English language variation in the United States is considered from a current sociolinguistic perspective. Social, regional, ethnic, gender, and stylistic-related language variation are covered, along with models for collecting, describing, and applying knowledge about language variation. Students are exposed to a wide range of data on language variation, with emphasis on vernacular varieties of American English. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4054
History of the English Language

Development of English including both its internal history (sounds, vocabulary, inflections, syntax) and its external history (political, social, and intellectual forces). Indo-European origins through the present, with special emphasis on the English Language in America.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4065, 4066
Contemporary Approaches to Linguistics

Thorough introductions to the core areas of the discipline of linguistics, as well as a number of subfields that make up this wide ranging field of study. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language change.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4074
English Syntax

This course introduces the grammatical structures of the English language and the processes by which we create and comprehend English sentences. Emphasis is on recent linguistic models. Topics include morphological structure, form- and structure-class taxonomy, phrase structure, transformational and generative approaches, language variation. Alternative models will be considered. Pre: ENGL 1106.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4084
Topics in Linguistics

An advanced course in such areas of linguistics as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, language change, dialectology, etc. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of natural language data within contemporary theoretical frameworks. Individual sections will focus upon differing areas of linguistics (to be specified in the subtitle of the course). Repeatable with different content for a maximum of nine credits. Pre: ENGL 4064 or ENGL 4074.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4114
Chaucer

This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of Geoffrey Chaucer. Junior standing required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4124
Introduction to Old English

This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of Geoffrey Chaucer. Junior standing required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4134/PSYC 4134
Language Development

Survey of theories, mechanisms, and processes in human language development. Empirical overview of phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Developmental trajectories of mono-and multilingual children. Cultural constraints on language. Perception of language and production of language, in typical and atypical subpopulations (e.g., hearing impairment). Junior/Senior Standing. Pre: PSYC 1004 or PSYC 2004. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4165, 4166
Shakespeare

The plays of Shakespeare. 4165: Shakespeare's early career (1590-1600), including history plays from Henry VI to Henry V, comedies from The Comedy of Errors to The Merry Wives of Windsor, and early tragedies such as Romeo and Juliet and Julius Caesar. 4166: the later career, including "problem plays" such as Measure for Measure, the great tragedies (Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Macbeth), and the romances such as The Tempest.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4214
Milton

Milton's poetry from the early works, including ComusLycidas, and the sonnets, to his major late works Paradise LostParadise Regained, and Samson Agonistes; with some attention to the important prose and to the historical context in which he wrote. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4314
Narrative Medicine

Introduction to the field of narrative medicine, with attention to narrative competence, the use of narrative in medical education, and the function of narratives in the experience of healing. Includes narrative approaches to biomedical ethics. Pre: ENGL 3154 or ENGL 3324 (3H, 3C)

 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4405, 4406
The English Novel

4405: Development of the English novel to 1850, including such novelists as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Austen, the Brontes, and Thackeray. 4406: Major novels from 1850 to World War II, including Dickens, Trollope, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, Huxley, and Waugh.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4415, 4416
American Narrative to 1950

4415: The history of American narrative to 1865; 4416: The history of American narrative from 1865 to 1950; genres to be addressed may include diaries, journals, letters, autobiographies, narratives of captivity, essays, sermons, folktales, short fiction, and novels. Junior standing required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4424
Digital Literary Culture

The interpretation of literary forms produced specifically for digital environments. Students will learn to analyze the design and rhetoric of hypertexts and hypermedia. Pre: ENGL 3354.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4434
The American Novel

Development of the American novel from its beginnings in the late 18th century to 20th century postmodernism. Emphasis on works representative of major authors (e.g., Twain and Morrison), important types (e.g., the romantic novel, the historical novel), and significant American themes (e.g., religion, nature, slavery, the frontier). Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4444
The British Novel

Development of the British Novel from the mid-eighteenth century to World War II, including works by such novelists as Defoe and Austen (origins through romantic era), Dickens, Hardy, and Stevenson (Victorian and Edwardian era), Joyce, Woolf, and Waugh (modern period). Emphasis on evolution of generic styles and conventions against a changing landscape of historical and cultural change. Pre: ENGL 1106 or ENGL 1204H or COMM 1016.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4504
Modern Poetry

British and American poetry from 1900 to World War II with emphasis on such figures as Pound, Williams, Stevens, Yeats, Sylvia Plath, Stevie Smith, and Eliot. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4514
Contemporary Poetry

British and American poetry from World War II to the present, with emphasis on such figures as Bishop, Lowell, Ashbery, Heaney, and Hughes.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4624
Studies in a British Author after 1800

This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of a single major British author (or pair of closely associated authors) writing after 1800. May be taken up to 3 times with different content. Junior standing required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4634
Studies in an American Author before 1900

This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of a single major American author (or a pair of closely associated authors) writing before 1900. May be taken up to three times with different content. Junior standing is required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4644
Studies in an American Author after 1900

This course examines the life, work, and critical reception of a single major American author (or pair of closely associated authors) writing after 1900. May be taken up to three times with different content. Junior standing is required.

  • 3 Credit Hours
Engl 4664
Contemporary Fiction

Fiction since 1945 with emphasis upon the most recent two decades: the late modernist narratives of Bellow, Updike, and Percy; the new fiction of Barth, Hawkes, Barthelme; the postmodern fiction of Federman, Carter, Fowles, Katz, Sukenick. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4674
Studies in Contemporary Culture

Studies the emerging changes across arts media (including architecture, cyberculture, essay, fiction, film, painting, performance, photography, poetry, theatre, video) in relation to current cultural and social theory from a variety of disciplines (including architectural theory, art, history, literature, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and social sciences).

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4684
Special Topics in Literature

An advanced, variable-content course which explores a significant or emergent literary issue or approach, or a body of literature. May be taken twice with different content. Pre: ENGL 3204 or ENGL 3214 or ENGL 3224 or ENGL 3234 or ENGL 3244 or ENGL 3254 or ENGL 3264 or ENGL 3274.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4704
Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

Designed for senior English majors who have selected the Creative Writing option, this is an intensive, advanced workshop. This capstone course builds on skills students have acquired in creative writing workshops. Primary focus is on the writing and critiquing of original fiction, while paying close attention to the work of established writers who are acknowledged masters of their genres. Students hone their skills as peer reviewers and constructive critics. In the process, they produce, a portfolio of their own fiction. Pre: ENGL 3704.Co: ENGL 4734.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4714
Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

Designed for senior English majors who have selected the Creative Writing option, this is an intensive, advanced workshop. This capstone course builds on the skills acquired in previous creative writing workshops. Primary focus is on the writing and critiquing of original poems, while paying close attention to the work of established poets who are acknowledged masters of their genres. Students hone their skills as peer reviewers and constructive critics. In the process, they produce a portfolio of their own poetry. Pre: ENGL 3714. Co: ENGL 4734. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4774
Senior Portfolio Development in Literature and Language

A course focused on the development of the senior portfolio and on making an effective and well-informed transition from undergraduate study to careers or graduate/professional school. English majors in the Literature, Language, and Culture option only. Pre: ENGL 2614.

  • 1 Credit Hours
ENGL 4784
Senior Seminar

In-depth study of a particular topic in language or literature. A capstone course aimed at integrating previous work in the discipline, open to non-majors by consent of instructor only. May be repeated once for credit with different content. Pre: ENGL 1106. 

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4854
Writing, Research, Study Abroad

Application of academic abroad experience to student's disciplinary studies on campus. Conducted after international education abroad experience. Collaborative writing and research projects as well as individual, independent research. Approval of course instructor required. Open to all majors. Pre-requisite: A formal study abroad educational experience; department approval.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4874
Issues in Professional and Public Discourse

In this course, students will focus on the ways in which scientific, technical, and professional communication influence, and are influenced by, public discourse. Drawing on strategies of rhetorical criticism, students will gain an understanding of the persuasive value of style, arrangement, and delivery by investigating their professional roles in helping to structure public debate. Pre: ENGL 3804.

  • 3 Credit Hours
ENGL 4954
Study Abroad: Issues and Texts

An advanced, variable-content and multi-disciplinary course that explores global themes and literature(s) during a month-long, faculty-led summer study abroad experience. Pre-requisite: Junior Standing required. Variable credit course, repeatable up to 6 credits.

  • Variable Credit Hours
ENGL 4964
Field Study
  • Variable Credit Hours
ENGL 4974
Independent Study
  • Variable Credit Hours
  • Honors Option Available
ENGL 4984
Special Study

X-grade allowed.

  • Variable Credit Hours
ENGL 4994
Undergraduate Research
  • Variable Credit Hours
  • Honors Option Available